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Study: Nearly half of 'essential workers' in U.S. at risk for severe COVID-19

Up to 74 million essential workers in the United States are at risk for severe COVID-19, an analysis estimates. Photo by Senior Airman Braydon Williams/U.S. Air Force/UPI
Up to 74 million essential workers in the United States are at risk for severe COVID-19, an analysis estimates. Photo by Senior Airman Braydon Williams/U.S. Air Force/UPI | License Photo

Nov. 9 (UPI) -- Nearly half of those classified as "essential workers" in the United States are at increased risk for severe COVID-19, according to an analysis published Monday by JAMA Internal Medicine.

This means that more than 74 million workers and those with whom they live could be at risk for serious illness, based on disease risk guidelines developed by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the researchers said.

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"Many parts of the country face high and rising infection rates, [and] we should not think about work exposure and health risks in isolation, given that workers and persons at increased risk often live in the same households," study co-author Thomas M. Selden told UPI.

"Insofar as we can reduce the prevalence of COVID-19 in our communities, we can reduce the extent to which policymakers have to choose between the economy and keeping the population safe," said Selden, an economist with the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality.

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Since the COVID-19 pandemic spread to the United States in March, states and cities across the country have instituted lockdown measures designed to limit the spread of the disease.

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Many of these measures entailed closing schools and non-essential businesses, with only banks, grocery stores, pharmacies and other businesses deemed to provide vital services allowed to stay open.

For this study, Selden and his colleagues analyzed data on the U.S. workforce to examine how many people were in essential jobs, how often they were able to work at home, their risk for severe COVID-19 and the potential health risks for their household members.

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Of the more than 157 million workers across the country, 72% are in jobs deemed essential -- based on U.S. Department of Homeland Security criteria -- and more than three-fourths of all essential workers are unable to work at home, Selden said.

Essential workers include those in the medical and healthcare, telecommunications, information technology systems, defense, food and agriculture, transportation and logistics and energy, water and wastewater industries, as well as those in law enforcement and public works, the DHS criteria stipulates.

The study notes that up to 60% of these workers have underlying health issues, placing them at increased risk for severe COVID-19 if they get infected, as defined by U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines.

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Those with diabetes, heart disease, high blood pressure and chronic respiratory conditions like asthma are considered to be at high risk for serious illness, the CDC says.

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Based on these findings, between roughly 57 million and 74 million adults working in on-site essential jobs -- and their families -- are at increased risk for serious illness, Selden and his colleagues estimated.

"Policymakers face important decisions about how to balance the economic benefits of keeping workers employed and the public health benefits of protecting those with increased risk of severe COVID-19," Selden said.

"These issues arise in the context of decisions to close segments of the economy and decisions about how to distribute vaccines, which will initially be available only with limited supply, [and] become all the more difficult when the prevalence of infection rises in parts of the country," he said.

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