Advertisement

Ambien shown to aid pace of stroke recovery in mice

Researchers said the post-stroke effects of Ambien may have application with humans.

By Stephen Feller
Ambien is typically used to treat sleep disorders, however its ability to increase a neurotransmitter in the brain led researchers to test its effects on stroke recovery. Photo by <a class="tpstyle" href="https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Category:Zolpidem#/media/File:Ambien10mg.jpg">DEA/Wikimedia</a>
Ambien is typically used to treat sleep disorders, however its ability to increase a neurotransmitter in the brain led researchers to test its effects on stroke recovery. Photo by DEA/Wikimedia

STANFORD, Calif., Dec. 18 (UPI) -- In experiments with mice, researchers found a low dose of zolpidem, sold as Ambien, sped up the rodents' recovery after having two different types of stroke, according to a new study.

Researchers at Stanford University saw the mice return to their pre-stroke abilities after being given the drug. Despite its effect on mice, the researchers caution that mice typically recover most of their functions after having a stroke, unlike many humans.

Advertisement

The inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA, secreted by nerve cells in the brain to temporarily prevent other nerve cells from propagating impulses, is typically released at synapses, where the bulk of signaling occurs. Nerve cells feature GABA receptors elsewhere on their surfaces, however, and extrasynaptic GABA signaling, as it is called, has previously been shown to impede stroke recovery in animals.

The Stanford researchers decided to investigate the effects of common synaptic GABA signaling after stroke, using Ambien with mice because the drug is known to increase GABA production.

RELATED Scientists manipulate rat consciousness, could treat brain injury

"Before this study, the thinking in the field was that GABA signaling after a stroke was detrimental," said Dr. Gary Steinberg, professor and chair of neurosurgery at Stanford University, in a press release. "But now we know that if it's the right kind of GABA signaling, it's beneficial. And we've identified an FDA-approved drug that decisively promotes the beneficial signaling."

Advertisement

The researchers induced strokes in mice that caused either severe sensory damage or impaired movement greatly, treating the mice with either a sub-sedative dose of Ambien or a solution that did not contain the drug.

Since most stroke patients are not treated early enough to prevent damage, researchers said it was important not to treat the mice until the damage was done, and waited three days before administering the drug, or placebo.

RELATED One-third of deaths in U.S. caused by cardiovascular disease

Mice treated with Ambien were more effective in tests -- the speed they could remove a piece of tape from one of their paws and their ability to traverse a horizontal rotating beam -- earlier than mice that had not received the drug.

The researchers cautioned that while Ambien helped mice recover more quickly, mice typically regain normal function over time after a stroke, which is not always the case with people. They note, however, the experiment shows GABA levels can be beneficial to stroke patients.

The study is published in the journal Brain.

RELATED Device, drug could help clear brain clots in stroke patients

Latest Headlines

Advertisement
Advertisement

Follow Us

Advertisement