Advertisement

Tracking Guillain-Barre after HPV vaccine

NEWARK, N.J., Feb. 17 (UPI) -- The human papillomavirus vaccine has not increased risks of Guillain-Barre but it warrants monitoring, U.S. researchers said.

Thirty-six cases of Guillain-Barre syndrome -- a muscle disorder caused by the immune system attacking the peripheral nervous system -- have occurred after HPV vaccination. The vaccine has been in use since June 2006 after being approved by the U.S. government for use in girls ages 9-26 to protect against some types of HPV that can cause cervical cancer.

Advertisement

Using data from the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System, the researchers also determined Guillain-Barre syndrome occurred within six weeks after vaccination in 75 percent of those affected.

"Our results show that Guillain-Barre is not occurring more often after HPV vaccination than it does in the general population," study author Dr. Nizar Souayah of the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey in Newark said in a statement. "However, the fact that most of these cases occurred within six weeks of vaccination does warrant careful monitoring for any additional cases and continued analysis."

The study findings are scheduled to be presented in Seattle at the annual meeting of the American Academy of Neurology.

Advertisement

Latest Headlines

Advertisement
Advertisement

Follow Us

Advertisement