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Mel Gibson tells interviewer Jesse Watters: 'It's never too late to fix stuff'

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Mel Gibson (R) and Rosalind Ross arrive on the red carpet for the 89th annual Academy Awards at the Dolby Theatre in the Hollywood section of Los Angeles in 2017. Gibson will soon be seen in "Father Stu." File Photo by Jim Ruymen/UPI | <a href="/News_Photos/lp/52b7698453cc2b8e00a1cb3c671f57a7/" target="_blank">License Photo</a>
Mel Gibson (R) and Rosalind Ross arrive on the red carpet for the 89th annual Academy Awards at the Dolby Theatre in the Hollywood section of Los Angeles in 2017. Gibson will soon be seen in "Father Stu." File Photo by Jim Ruymen/UPI | License Photo

April 2 (UPI) -- Lethal Weapon and Braveheart star Mel Gibson spoke to Fox News interviewer Jesse Watters about the themes of trauma, redemption and hope that permeate his new film, Father Stu.

The movie is based on a true story about the titular boxer (Mark Wahlberg,) who becomes a priest and suffers from a progressive muscle disease. Gibson plays his father.

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Watters asked the actor and Oscar-winning filmmaker Friday how viewers might relate to the suffering portrayed in the film.

"Everybody's got a boulder, man, or something they've got to drag around," Gibson said.

"Something's going to come by and knock you down at some point of your life -- now, later -- and how do you stand up from that?" he added. "How do you, not only stand up, but find the purpose in that? There is a purpose for all of this. So, it's looking for that purpose. I think if we are too self-involved, I think if your head is too big -- let's put it that way -- it's an easier target to get hit. If your ego's not that healthy, if you realize there is something greater than you and find a little humility, you're not going to get hit as hard."

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Gibson, who has avoided the spotlight in recent years after a drunken driving arrest and backlash for allegedly making racist and anti-Semitic remarks, candidly discussed with Watters how he hasn't always been the perfect father to his nine children, but how he now tries his best to make amends.

"It's never too late to fix stuff," Gibson said. "I have realized on a few occasions that you can go back and fix stuff if you missed it the first time around."

At the end of the 5-minute chat, Watters pressed Gibson to speculate what might have happened if he hit Chris Rock at Sunday's Oscars ceremony the way Will Smith did.

Gibson laughed and didn't answer as Gibson's publicist wrapped the interview.

Smith was allowed to stay at the Oscars and even went on to win Best Actor for his role in King Richard after slapping Rock for making a joke about his wife. Smith later apologized to Rock and resigned from the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, which bestows the Oscars.

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