Advertisement

Robert Shapiro reveals whispered exchange between himself, O.J. Simpson

By
Marilyn Malara
Lawyer Robert Shapiro and his wife Linell arrive at the Elton John Aids Foundation's 24th Annual Academy Awards viewing party on February 28, 2016. Shapiro revealed what he says former client O.J. Simpson whispered into his ear after receiving his not guilty verdict. File Photo by Christine Chew/UPI
Lawyer Robert Shapiro and his wife Linell arrive at the Elton John Aids Foundation's 24th Annual Academy Awards viewing party on February 28, 2016. Shapiro revealed what he says former client O.J. Simpson whispered into his ear after receiving his not guilty verdict. File Photo by Christine Chew/UPI | License Photo

WASHINGTON, May 18 (UPI) -- Attorney Robert Shapiro said O.J. Simpson whispered a message of relief and confirmation into his ear moments after his acquittal.

The famed lawyer, now 73, divulged as much to Fox News' Megyn Kelly, with whom he sat Tuesday to talk about the 1995 dual murder trial.

Advertisement

"You had told me this would be the result from the beginning," were Simpson's words, Shapiro said. "You were right."

Discussing how he and Simpson's other defense attorneys, dubbed the "dream team," ultimately won the case, Shapiro said. "The prosecution wedded themselves to one knife, one killer theory. There is a strong possibility that more than one person was involved."

It became apparent to Shapiro his client would go free once he tried on the glove allegedly used by Nicole Brown Simpson and Ronald Goldman's killer.

"It was a little bit wide in my palm and a little bit wide in my fingers," he said of the gloves used as evidence against Simpson. "O.J. Simpson has enormous hands, and I knew that glove would not fit him."

Advertisement

During the interview, Shapiro would not reveal whether he believed his former client -- who at 68 years old is currently behind bars after a 2008 kidnapping and robbery conviction -- was innocent of the murders. Instead, he insisted his was a "fair verdict."

"There's two types of justice that we deal with in America: There's moral justice and there's legal justice," he began.

"If you look at it from a moral point of view, a lot of people would say he absolutely did it. I deal in legal justice, as you did as a lawyer, and that's proof beyond a reasonable doubt. And there's no question in my mind that any fair juror who saw that case from the beginning to the end would conclude there was a reasonable doubt."

"As far as moral justice, I haven't discussed it with anyone, including my wife," Shapiro said.

Latest Headlines