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'TTYL,' 'Twilight' on challenged book list

Author of the book series Stephanie Meyer attends the premiere of the film "Twilight" in Los Angeles on November 17, 2008. (UPI Photo/ Phil McCarten)
Author of the book series Stephanie Meyer attends the premiere of the film "Twilight" in Los Angeles on November 17, 2008. (UPI Photo/ Phil McCarten) | License Photo

CHICAGO, April 14 (UPI) -- Lauren Myracle's "TTYL" young adult novel series is No. 1 on the American Library Association's Top 10 list of the Most Frequently Challenged Books of 2009.

"Even though not every book will be right for every reader, the ability to read, speak, think and express ourselves freely are core American values," Barbara Jones, director of the ALA's Office for Intellectual Freedom, said in a statement Wednesday. "Protecting one of our most fundamental rights -- the freedom to read -- means respecting each other's differences and the right of all people to choose for themselves what they and their families read."

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The "TTYL" books were challenged on the basis they feature nudity, sexually explicit images, offensive language and drugs, and are unsuited to the age group they target, the ALA said.

Coming in at No. 2 on the list is "And Tango Makes Three" by Peter Parnell and Justin Richardson; "The Perks of Being a Wallflower" by Stephen Chbosky at No. 3; "To Kill A Mockingbird" by Harper Lee at No. 4; and the "Twilight" series by Stephenie Meyer at No. 5.

Rounding out the top tier are "Catcher in the Rye" by J.D. Salinger at No. 6; "My Sister's Keeper" by Jodi Picoult at No. 7; "The Earth, My Butt, and Other Big, Round Things" by Carolyn Mackler at No. 8; "The Color Purple" by Alice Walker at No. 9; and "The Chocolate War" by Robert Cormier at No. 10.

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J.K. Rowling's "Harry Potter" series of fantasy novels tops the list of the 100 Most Frequently Challenged Books of the Decade of 2000-09. The books are frequently challenged for various issues including occult/Satanism and anti-family themes, the ALA said.

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