Denmark sets milestone for EV charges

A utility provider said Denmark is one of the most developed markets for electric vehicles in Europe.
By Daniel J. Graeber  |  Dec. 14, 2017 at 7:51 AM
share with facebook
share with twitter

Dec. 14 (UPI) -- The Danish market for electric vehicles set a milestone with more than 1 million charges and 36 million miles since 2014, a utility provider said Thursday.

German utility company E.ON said it's leading in the Danish market with its 1,300 charging points. Since 2014, the company said more than 1 million drivers charged up their vehicles at E.ON stations and it's now working on partnerships to build more stations at car parks, fast-food chains and retail service stations.

"Denmark is now one of the most developed e-mobility markets in Europe," the company said in a statement.

The Germany utility company in November said it was supported by $11.6 million in funding from the European Commission to team up with service provider CLEVER to establish an electric-vehicle corridor linking Norway to Italy through a network of 180 charging stations.

Each station will be equipped with as many as six charging points with enough electricity to charge a 250-mile range battery in about a half hour. Charging stations will be spaced every 90 miles or so across Italy, France, Germany, Denmark, the United Kingdom, Sweden and Norway during the next three years.

Two million electric vehicles were on the road globally last year, though nearly all of those were in China, the European Union and the United States. A report from the International Energy Agency found that dense metropolitan areas were taking leadership roles in encouraging electric vehicles because of pollution concerns.

Germany, which has one of the greener economies in the European Union, set aside $355 million to help build tens of thousands of charging points on the German highway network.

Dorothee Bär, the federal transport minister in Germany, said the main obstacle to getting more electric vehicles on the road isn't technology, but driver concerns about running out of battery power.

Related UPI Stories
Trending Stories