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Successful test of land-based Naval Strike Missile announced by Raytheon

Successful test of land-based Naval Strike Missile announced by Raytheon
Raytheon this week released a photo of the first land-based Naval Strike Missile test, held in November on the California coast. Photo courtesy U.S. Navy

April 29 (UPI) -- Raytheon Missiles and Defense announced this week that it has successfully demonstrated the Navy Marine Expeditionary Ship Interdiction System.

The test demonstrated the system's ability to fire a Naval Strike Missile from a U.S. Marine Corps ground launcher and score a direct hit against a surface target, according to a Wednesday Raytheon press release.

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"Our Naval Strike Missile is a vital weapon for denying enemies the use of key maritime terrain," Kim Ernzen, vice president of Naval Power at Raytheon Missiles and Defense, said in the release.

"This test further demonstrates our partnership for advancing the Marine Corps' modernization priorities of enabling sea control and denial operations," Ernzen said.

USNI News reported that the test took place in November in Point Migu, Calif.

The NSM, designed for littoral combat ships and future frigates, is a multi-mission cruise missile designed to destroy well-defended maritime and land targets.

In March, the USS Gabrielle Giffords successfully launched an NSM as part of operational testing.

In January, the Navy announced plans to experiment with installation of the Norwegian-designed Naval Strike Missile on a variety of vessels, including amphibious docking ships and Freedom- and Independence-class variants of littoral combat ships.

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Marine Corps officials also said last year that the branch plans to experiment with mounting NSM's on a Joint Light Tactical Vehicle with a launcher as a short-term way to achieve an anti-ship capability.

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