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Space Force issues guidance on uniform configuration

The chief of space operations for the U.S. Space Force displays the service’s uniform name tapes in the Pentagon in this January photo. Photo by Robert Barnett/U.S. Air Force
The chief of space operations for the U.S. Space Force displays the service’s uniform name tapes in the Pentagon in this January photo. Photo by Robert Barnett/U.S. Air Force

Aug. 27 (UPI) -- The U.S. Space Force issued detailed guidelines Thursday on the wear of the new service's operational camouflage pattern, with a grace period of seven months to update uniforms to the Space Force-specific configuration.

Per the guidance, described in a Space Force press release, service members will wear a minimum configuration consisting of a full-color U.S. flag patch, grade insignia, occupational badge and name and service tapes with space blue embroidery on a three-color occupational camouflage pattern.

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"Our uniforms are the first visual cue of our identity as a service," said Chief Master Sgt. Roger A. Towberman, senior enlisted advisor at the U.S Space Force. "Adopting the OCP worn in the joint environment reflects our role in the joint warfighting effort, and we incorporated Space Force-specific colors and configuration to establish our own independent identity."

The flag patch will be worn on the left sleeve and tapes and insignia may be sewn or velcroed to the uniform, but all components must use the same method of attachment, the guidelines say.

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The memo allows members to continue to wear the airman battle uniform with the existing Air Force configuration until April 1, 2021.

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The newly-created branch unveiled its working uniform -- occupational camouflage similar to the uniforms used by the Army and Air Force -- in January but changed the name plate design last month to an easier-to-read color scheme.

The service also revealed its official logo and motto, "Semper Supra," or "Always Above," in Washington, D.C., at the end of July and unfurled its flag at the White House in May.

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