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Lockheed awarded $1.1B for F-16 work for Slovakia, Iraq

Lockheed Martin received separate contracts Wednesday from the Air Force for production and support of F-16 aircraft for Slovakia, and support and training for Iraq.

By Stephen Feller
Iraqi air force F-16 Fghting Falcons conduct a training mission over Iraq on May 26, 2019. Photo by Master Sgt. Russ Scalf/U.S. Air Force
Iraqi air force F-16 Fghting Falcons conduct a training mission over Iraq on May 26, 2019. Photo by Master Sgt. Russ Scalf/U.S. Air Force

Aug. 1 (UPI) -- Lockheed Martin was awarded two contracts worth more than $1.1 billion by the U.S. Air Force for production, support and training on the F-16 for two allied nations.

The two foreign military sales contracts, announced Wednesday by the Department of Defense, cover production and support of F-16 fighter aircraft for Slovakia, as well as contractor logistics support and a training detachment for the F-16 at Balad Air Base in Iraq.

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The contract for Slovakia, valued at just under $800 million, is for production of 14 Slovak Republic F-16 block 70 aircraft. The fighter jets will be built at Lockheed's Greenville, South Carolina facility, with an expected completion date of Jan. 31, 2024.

Slovakia in 2018 opted for the F-16 over the Gripen to replace its MiG-29 jets, about two months after the U.S. State Department gave its blessing for the potential sale.

The Slovak Republic will be receiving the newest version of the F-16, the Block 70/72 F-16V, which includes new capabilities for the aircraft.

Lockheed on Wednesday also was awarded a $315 million contract by Air Force for contractor logistics support and the establishment of a training detachment at Balad as part of F-16 Contractor Logistics Support Phase IV.

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Work under the deal will be performed at both Balad and at Lockheed's Greenville facility, with an expectation it will be completed by Dec. 31, 2022.

Iraq in 2011 signed a roughly $4.3 billion deal to purchase at least 96 F-16s, receiving the first 36 of them in 2014.

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