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British-built Hawk training jets to be maintained by BAE

By Ed Adamczyk
British-built Hawk training jets to be maintained by BAE
BAE Systems' Hawk Advanced Jet Trainer, pictured, is a new version of the aircraft flown by 18 governments -- including the United Arab Emirates, which contracted with the country for continued support of its Hawk fleet. Photo courtesy of BAE Systems

Nov. 15 (UPI) -- London-based BAE Systems Ltd. announced an agreement on Wednesday to maintain and support Hawk training planes in the United Arab Emirates.

BAE will contract with the UAE-based Advanced Military Maintenance Repair and Overhaul Center, or AMMROC, to provide repairs and upgrades to Hawk Mk61, Mk102 and Mk63 aircraft at a facility in Abu Dhabi until 2020.

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The facility is on the grounds of Al Ain International Airport in Abu Dhabi.

The single-engine, jet-powered advanced technology aircraft is typically used for training, although it also can serve as a light combat aircraft.

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About 1,000 British-built Hawk planes are in service with 18 governments around the world for training pilots to fly larger and more advanced fighter planes. The Hawk planes feature a variety of simulators for realistic combat scenarios.

The contract with AMMROC -- owned by Emirates Defense Industries Corp., Lockheed Martin Corp. and the Lockheed Martin subsidiary Sikorsky -- will include training and maintenance programs to customers.

"This agreement builds on the strong partnership we've had with AMMROC since 2013 and provides a platform for our continued assistance in support of the current Hawk fleet in the UAE," Mike Swales, Hawk International Program director at BAE Systems, said in a press release. "It will strengthen and enhance the collaborative work between our two organizations in the long-term maintenance of the aircraft."

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