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Northrop Grumman to integrate missile countermeasure systems for Air Force, Navy

Northrop Grumman Systems Corp. has been awarded a $99.1 million modification to a previous contract to install the Large Aircraft Infrared Countermeasures systems on combat aircraft.

By Stephen Carlson
Northrup Grumman signed a contract Tuesday to integrate its AN/AAQ-24 Large Aircraft Infrared Countermeasure system, pictured, on a variety of combat aircraft for the U.S. Navy and U.S Air Force. Photo courtesy Northrup Grumman
Northrup Grumman signed a contract Tuesday to integrate its AN/AAQ-24 Large Aircraft Infrared Countermeasure system, pictured, on a variety of combat aircraft for the U.S. Navy and U.S Air Force. Photo courtesy Northrup Grumman

April 26 (UPI) -- Northrop Grumman Systems Corp. has been awarded a $99.5 million modification to a previous contract to integrate the Navy's Large Aircraft Infrared Countermeasures. The system will serve on aircraft with both the Navy and Air Force.

The program includes weapon replaceable assemblies and support equipment, 302 advanced threat warning sensors, 41 control indicator units, 41 2103 signal processors, 82 guardian laser transmitter assemblies, 82 GLTA shipping containers, 16 multi-role electro-optical end-to-end test sets, and 14 smart connector assemblies.

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Work on the project will mostly be performed at Rolling Meadows, Ill., and Goleta, Calif. Smaller parts of the contract will be based across the country, and include some suppliers outside the continental United States.

The Large Aircraft Infrared Countermeasure system is designed to defeat incoming infrared enemy missiles by targeting a laser beam at their seeker heads.The resulting interference would then cause the missile to lose lock and veer off course.

It is primarily meant for big, slow moving aircraft such as cargo planes, bombers, and even passenger aircraft. Congress has in recent years discussed considering passenger airliners be equipped with the technology to counter potential shoulder-fired missile attacks from terrorists, but major U.S. carriers have shown little interest.

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The work is expected to be completed by April 2019.

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