Advertisement

Fukushima contaminating China's seas?

By
1/2
Tamura-city's evacuees undergoes a screening test after return from a brief visit back to their home inside the restricted zone of a 20 km radius from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant at the Furumichi gymnasium in Tamura, Fukushima prefecture, Japan, May 22, 2011. UPI/Keizo Mori | <a href="/News_Photos/lp/3d6fe452b7c41721385f0c7723f1b71c/" target="_blank">License Photo</a>
Tamura-city's evacuees undergoes a screening test after return from a brief visit back to their home inside the restricted zone of a 20 km radius from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant at the Furumichi gymnasium in Tamura, Fukushima prefecture, Japan, May 22, 2011. UPI/Keizo Mori | License Photo

BEIJING, Aug. 16 (UPI) -- Chinese sea waters are at risk of being contaminated by radioactive effluents from Japan's Fukushima nuclear power plant, which was crippled by the March 11 earthquake, China's ocean watchdog warned.

China will increase monitoring for radioactive substances in the waters off Fukushima and in the East China Sea, with the aim of forecasting possible effects on the environment and the safety of marine food, said the State Oceanic Administration's environmental department, China Daily newspaper reported Tuesday.

Advertisement

The department's most recent monitoring report indicated that seawater samples from the first group collected contained 300 times the amount of radioactive cesium found in nature and 100 times the amount of strontium.

Since Cesium-137 and Strontium-90 both have half-lives of about 30 years, they are more likely to eventually enter the food chain and affect the health of consumers, the department said.

RELATED Number put on level of Fukushima radiation

Tokyo Electric Power Co., operator of the stricken Fukushima plant, in April announced plans to discharge about 11,500 tons of low-level radioactive water from the plant into the sea.

On Monday, the Japanese Cabinet agreed to merge the Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency and the Nuclear Safety Commission into a single Nuclear Safety Agency, putting the environment ministry in charge of regulating the nuclear sector.

Advertisement

Previously, NISA operated under the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry.

RELATED Japan cuts growth forecast to 0.5 percent

The move is seen as a significant victory for Japanese Prime Minister Naoto Kan who has been fighting to remove nuclear regulation from the influence of METI, which has a long history of promoting nuclear energy.

The new entity, expected to be fully operational by next April, will be responsible for handling other nuclear-related activities, including emergency response, radiation monitoring and dealing with the threat of nuclear terrorist attacks, China's state-run news agency Xinhua reports.

Japan's environment ministry will "make every effort to restore trust in the administration of nuclear safety," said Environment Minister Satsuki Eda.

RELATED Japan's TEPCO reports loss of $7.4 billion

NISA had come under fire for its sluggish and ineffectual response to the March 11 quake-triggered Fukushima plant crisis, the world's worst nuclear disaster in 25 years.

NISA faces allegations of soliciting pro-nuclear individuals to attend government-sponsored symposiums on nuclear energy and also arranging for pro-nuclear residents to pose planted questions.

Along with TEPCO, Japanese nuclear power operators Chubu Electric Power Co. and Kyushu Electric Power Co. have been implicated in cases of government and industry attempts to influence public opinion on nuclear power.

RELATED Japanese nuclear officials to be replaced

Latest Headlines

Advertisement
Advertisement

Follow Us

Advertisement