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Minnesota judge cuts list of legal heirs to Prince's vast estate to 8

Because Prince didn't leave a will, it's up to the state of Minnesota to determine who have legal rights to the singer's wealth.

By
Doug G. Ware
A Minnesota judge on Friday dismissed the claims of 29 people who sought to be rightful heirs to the vast estate of singer Prince, who died suddenly on April 21 without a will. Eight claimants remain, all potential siblings or half siblings since Prince's parents are deceased and he has no known children. File Photo by Jim Ruymen/UPI
A Minnesota judge on Friday dismissed the claims of 29 people who sought to be rightful heirs to the vast estate of singer Prince, who died suddenly on April 21 without a will. Eight claimants remain, all potential siblings or half siblings since Prince's parents are deceased and he has no known children. File Photo by Jim Ruymen/UPI | License Photo

CHASKA, Minn., July 29 (UPI) -- The number of potential heirs seeking millions from the vast estate of late musician Prince was cut down by a judge Friday, from nearly 30 down to just a handful.

In a 19-page ruling Friday, Carver County, Minn., Judge Kevin W. Eide whittled down the list -- which included numerous purported relatives claiming a legal share of the singer's estate, valued between $100 million and $300 million.

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Ongoing claims of a legal right to part of Prince's wealth have endured since his sudden death on April 21. Many have undergone DNA testing in an effort to provide a clearer picture as to who rightfully has a claim, and who doesn't.

In his ruling, Eide cited Minnesota law in declaring that anyone other than Prince's siblings or half-siblings are automatically excluded from his estate -- a provision that dismissed the claims of 29 people.

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Eight claimants remain, though, and six will undergo further DNA testing, the judge ruled. Among them are Prince's sister, Tyka Nelson, and three half siblings, John, Norrine and Sharon Nelson. Two of their descendants, Brianna Nelson and Victoria Nelson, will also be genetically tested.

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Half siblings Omarr Baker or Alfred Jackson, however, do not need to submit to DNA tests, Eide ruled.

Prince died abruptly from what the medical examiner determined was a toxic drug overdose. Because no will has been found addressing his assets, Minnesota law must determine who can legally take pieces of the star's earnings and property.

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Minnesota law states that children and parents are first and second in line when it comes to establishing rightful heirs. However, in Prince's case neither exist -- as his parents are deceased, as is the only child known to be born to the singer, a boy, who died shortly after birth in 1996 from a genetic disorder.

Five people who claimed to be Prince's children were among those ruled out Friday.

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