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Entertainment Weekly Magazine's - 'The 100 Greatest Movie Stars of all Time'

By VERNON SCOTT UPI Hollywood Reporter

HOLLYWOOD -- Some people become legends in their own time, but not many. Usually the passage of time provides the key perspective to legend status. That's especially true in the transient world of movies. Entertainment Weekly magazine has perked up Hollywood's usual autumnal doldrums with a special edition dedicated to 'The 100 Greatest Movie Stars of All Time.' Its editors weighed the stars by their impact in each of the past seven decades, from the '30s through the '90s, and coupled the teens and '20s of this century as 'the early years.' The magazine's greatest 100 are ranked in order of greatness, from Humphrey Bogart, No. 1, to No. 100, Susan Hayward. The criteria by which they were chosen: 'The 100 stars ranked here are legends not necessarily because they are the greatest actors, ormade the best movies, or stayed the longest at the feast. 'Each is here because he or she created a unique personality, bigger than any single film -- bigger often, than the man or woman behind the makeup.' The magazine's legendary 100 provides plenty of fodder for those inclined to quibble with the findings. For instance, John Barrymore is not on the list, but Eddie Murphy (No. 92) and Kevin Costner (No. 82) are. Betty Grable is absent but Natalie Wood is No. 70. Lana Turner is missing but Jodie Foster is No. 57. Of the top 10 on the list only three are living: Katharine Hepburn, No. 2; James Stewart, No. 3, and Marlon Brando, No. 7.

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Others, in order, are Marilyn Monroe (4), John Wayne (5), Cary Grant (6), Clark Gable (8), Charlie Chaplin (9) and Bette Davis (10). By most accounts movie legends are measured by longevity, box-office appeal, industry awards, salaries and popularity with fans. Current stars do surprisingly well in this exercise, which rarely is the case among statesmen, politicians and philosophers. On almost any list of the greatest American presidents, the prominent names are from the country's early history: George Washington, John Adams, Thomas Jefferson and Abraham Lincoln. Certainly not from the past three decades. It comes as no surprise to find a preponderance of old-timers on this list: Ingrid Bergman (No. 12), Judy Garland (13), Henry Fonda (29), Buster Keaton (35), Rudolph Valentino (32), Mary Pickford (69) and Douglas Fairbanks Sr. (68). On the other hand, it seems a bit impertinent to include Bruce Willis (97), Kevin Costner (82), Tom Cruise (31) and Mel Gibson (48) in the same league with Spencer Tracy (15), Gary Cooper (18), James Cagney (14), Henry Fonda (29) and Montgomery Clift (60). Genuine legends have stood the test of time. Entertainment Weekly takes that into account, acknowledging that stars of the '70s, '80s and '90s were held to a different standard. In a disclaimer, the editors wrote, 'Michelle Pfeiffer (67) and Robin Williams (50) cannot rightly be called 'legends' on the order of Bogie or Kate Hepburn. Not yet -- maybe not ever.' But they figure some current performers seem to be at least halfway to legendhood. Other contemporary stars on the list, quibble or not, are Arnold Schwarzenegger (53), Tom Hanks (26), Dustin Hoffman (28), Susan Sarandon (93) and Meryl Streep (37). Perception, apparently, is pre-eminent when it comes to rating all- time movie stars. No. 22 is James Dean, a genuine legend. Although he made only three movies -- none great hits when they first came out -- he became a worldwide symbol for rebellious youth. On the other hand, Mickey Rooney made more than 100 movies and became an icon for 1940s teenagers and their families. Yet he is not on the list. It is an anomaly to find Sharon Stone (94) and Julia Roberts (90) on the list, but not Shirley MacLaine nor Ann Sheridan. Only one child star made the list: Shirley Temple, No. 38, the greatest female box-office draw in movie history. Perhaps because Hollywood dominates movies internationally, there were only a handful of foreign-born performers on the roster. Brigitte Bardot (95), Ingrid Bergman (12), Greta Garbo (25), Sophia Loren (85), Julie Andrews (96), Laurence Olivier (20), Sean Connery (24), Richard Burton (78) and Anthony Hopkins (99). Two comedy teams made the golden circle: Stan Laurel and Oliver Hardy (45) and The Marx Brothers (62). A few legends were comedians and singers who made the grade in movies, including Frank Sinatra (59), Bing Crosby (76), Doris Day (72) and Bob Hope (88). More men made the list than women, 63 to 37. A couple of top leading men heartthrobs of '40s and '50s, Robert Taylor and Tyrone Power, didn't get the nod, but their '60s and '70s counterparts, Robert Redford (30) and Paul Newman (13) did. It is no accident a preponderance of those on the list were Academy Award winners and box-office giants. Among box-office titans: Rudolph Valentino (32), Elizabeth Taylor (11), Clint Eastwood (16), Sylvester Stallone (80), Burt Lancaster (39), Harrison Ford (46) and Steve McQueen (56). A sampling of Oscar winners: Gregory Peck (58), Charlton Heston (52), Jane Fonda (51), Grace Kelly (27), Sidney Poitier (44), Warren Beatty (77), Vivien Leigh (75) and Jessica Lange (87). Woody Allen, in a category all his own, was ranked No. 84.

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