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Princess Diana admits affair

By PAUL GOULD

LONDON, Nov. 20 -- Princess Diana admitted to committing adultery in an hour-long television interview Monday and accused the Buckingham Palace establishment of waging a campaign to discredit her. Speaking on the British Broadcasting Corp's Panorama program, the 34- year-old princess of Wales said she doubted she would ever be the British queen, and she spoke emotionally of her devastation at the collapse her marriage with Prince Charles. The princess discussed her battle with bulimia and described how she attempted to cause herself bodily harm during a bout of depression. The princess gave the interview to the BBC without giving prior notice to Buckingham Palace. News of the interview was made public last week on Prince Charles' birthday while he was on a state trip to Germany. The interview was viewed as a response to the prince's earlier televised interview, in which me admitted having been unfaithful to his marriage after it had broken down. He also spoke of his friendship with Camilla Parker-Bowles during the interview. The Panorama program Monday opened with famous scenes from the fairytale royal marriage of Charles and Diana on July 29, 1981. Speaking out directly for the first time since Prince Charles acknowledged publicly that he had been unfaithful, the princess said she too had had an affair. The princess described Gulf War veteran Capt. James Hewitt as a close personal friend. Asked if their relationship became more than a friendship, Diana replied, 'Yes it did.' 'I adored him,' she said.

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'I was in love with him.' The BBC asked her about the book, 'Princess in Love,' published last year, which narrated the story of a love affair between the princess and Hewitt in the torrid style of a romantic novel. 'Yes, there was factual evidence in the book, but a lot of it came from another world,' Diana said. She said Hewitt had let her down by allowing his story be sold to produce the book. The princess of Wales said she suspected Charles' affair with Camilla Parker-Bowles, attributing her suspicion to 'a woman's instinct.' Asked if she was aware of the relationship, she said, 'Yes I was, but I wasn't in a position to do anything about it.' 'There were three of us in this marriage, so it was a bit crowded,' she added. Being thrust into the public spotlight of royal life was greatly distressing, Diana said, and led in part to her widely reported problem with bulimia. Admitting the condition publicly for the first time, she said, 'I had bulimia for a number of years.' 'It was a symptom of what was going on in my marriage,' she added. She also told the BBC that while in the depths of despair she had tried to inflict bodily harm upon herself. She said had deliberately done something to her arms and legs, but she did not elaborate further. 'I was crying out because I wanted to get better, so yes I did inflict upon myself. I didn't like myself,' she said. Diana laid much of the blame for her unhappiness on the Buckingham Palace establishment, where she said she didn't fit in because she was 'a free spirit.' Princess Diana said that after 1992, the year of her separation and a year described by Queen Elizabeth II as her 'annus horibilis,' the palace conducted a campaign against her. 'Visits abroad were blocked and letters were lost when I became seen as a problem,' the princess said. 'Yes, everything changed after we separated.' 'My husband's side were busy stopping me,' she said, adding : 'The enemy was my husband's department.' Diana, however, ruled out initiating a divorce against Prince Charles for the sake of their sons, Prince William and Prince Harry. She indicated any such decision about the family's future would be up to her husband. 'I await my husband's decision on the way we're all going to go,' she said. 'But to date neither of us have discussed it. 'I take some responsibility that our marriage went the way it did. I take half of it, but not more than that because it takes two,' she said. Diana urged the monarchy to change and denied setting out to undermine the institution. 'I do think there are a few things that could change...for example they (royal couples) could walk hand-in-hand instead of being so distant,' she said. 'I would like a monarchy that likes contact with people.' Asked if she thought she could still become queen, Diana replied 'No I don't.' 'I'd like to be queen of people's hearts, but not of this country... not with the establishment I'm married into,' she said.

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london xxx anything about it.' 'There were three of us in this marriage, so it was a bit crowded,' she added. Being thrust into the public spotlight of royal life was greatly distressing, Diana said, and led in part to her widely reported problem with bulimia. Admitting the condition publicly for the first time, she said, 'I had bulimia for a number of years.' 'It was a symptom of what was going on in my marriage,' she added. She also told the BBC that while in the depths of despair she had tried to inflict bodily harm upon herself. She said had deliberately done something to her arms and legs, but she did not elaborate further. 'I was crying out because I wanted to get better, so yes I did inflict upon myself. I didn't like myself,' she said. Diana laid much of the blame for her unhappiness on the Buckingham Palace establishment, where she said she didn't fit in because she was 'a free spirit.' Princess Diana said that after 1992, the year of her separation and a year described by Queen Elizabeth II as her 'annus horibilis,' the palace conducted a campaign against her. 'Visits abroad were blocked and letters were lost when I became seen as a problem,' the princess said. 'Yes, everything changed after we separated.' 'My husband's side were busy stopping me,' she said, adding : 'The enemy was my husband's department.' Diana, however, ruled out initiating a divorce against Prince Charles for the sake of their sons, Prince William and Prince Harry. She indicated any such decision about the family's future would be up to her husband. 'I await my husband's decision on the way we're all going to go,' she said. 'But to date neither of us have discussed it. 'I take some responsibility that our marriage went the way it did. I take half of it, but not more than that because it takes two,' she said. Diana urged the monarchy to change and denied setting out to undermine the institution. 'I do think there are a few things that could change...for example they (royal couples) could walk hand-in-hand instead of being so distant,' she said. 'I would like a monarchy that likes contact with people.' Asked if she thought she could still become queen, Diana replied 'No I don't.' 'I'd like to be queen of people's hearts, but not of this country... not with the establishment I'm married into,' she said.

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