Advertisement

Former LSU Athletic Director Bob Brodhead and local media...

By REED BRANSON

BATON ROUGE, La. -- Former LSU Athletic Director Bob Brodhead and local media executive Douglas Manship were found guilty of violating the state's ethics codes, the Commission on Ethics for Public Officials announced Thursday.

However, the commission decided the violations were minor and the two were not 'guilty of wrongdoing in the ordinary sense of the word.' Nathan Fisher, Brodhead's attorney, and Manship said they would accept the commission ruling. They now must sign a consent agreement. Brodhead was fined $2,500, but the commission immediately suspended the penalty.

Advertisement

'It was a technical violation and we are satisfied with the agreement,' Fisher said.

The attorney said the ruling followed negotiations in which Brodhead cooperated fully and the panel, in turn, agreed to suspend the fine and publicly state their finding of no intentional misconduct.

'I'm certainly pleased with it,' Manship said of the ruling. 'The Ethics Commission had no choice.'

Brodhead and Manship had been accused of violating the state ethics code in connection with the 'Bob Brodhead Program' on Manship-owned WJBO-AM radio.

Brodhead was accused of receiving payment for the radio show while the company that owned the station also had contracts with the LSU Athletic Department. It was also Brodhead's job to promote the Athletic Department, so the panel charged he should not have been paid extra by WJBO.

Advertisement

Charges also stemmed from a fishing trip Brodhead and his wife took in April to the Mexican Baja. Manship flew Brodhead and his wife in Manship's company's airplane and provided lodging for the couple at his private club in LaPaz, Mexico.

Following the panel's charges earlier this year, LSU Chancellor James Wharton suspended Brodhead, and Brodhead subsequently resigned the post for an undisclosed amount of money paid by private individuals.

When the charges were first leveled against Brodhead, he was already on probation for planting eavesdropping devices in his office to listen to NCAA interviews that would be taking place there.

Latest Headlines

Advertisement
Advertisement

Follow Us

Advertisement