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A splinter faction of the Church of Scientology that...

LOS ANGELES -- A splinter faction of the Church of Scientology that the parent organization is seeking to shut down has won a temporary victory in its battle to use scriptures allegedly stolen in Denmark.

Under Wednesday's ruling by a federal judge, the Advanced Abilities Center, a Santa Barbara-based church headed by an ex-Scientologist who claims to be a former close associate of Scientology founder L. Ron Hubbard, can continue until a hearing Nov. 21 to use scriptural material allegedly stolen from a Scientology branch in Denmark.

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U.S. District Judge Mariana Pfaelzer also instructed the group not to release any of the material to the public or news media. The same order was applied to another former member currently suing the Church of Scientology for fraud.

Some of the so-called 'upper-level technology' was published last week by the Los Angeles Times. The article summarized the Scientology material as tracing human aberrations back 75 million years to an interplanetary tyrant named Xemu.

Some of the same material is being used by former Scientologist Larry Wollersheim in his $25-million fraud suit scheduled for trial in January.

At the Nov. 21 hearing, attorneys for the Scientologists will try to convince Pfaelzer that the Advance Abilities Center is conducting religious counseling using upper-level material taken in December 1983 from a church outlet in Copenhagen and must be returned.

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David Mayo, president of the Advanced Abilities Center, claims he originally wrote much of the material while working with Hubbard during a 23-year career with the Church of Scientology. He said when he founded the rival group in July 1983, he 'reworked and improved' much of the material.

If deprived of the scriptures, Mayo said he would be unable to practice 'a large portion of our religion.'

Mayo's attorney, Michael Treman, called the Scientologists' allegations that the material was stolen 'a bunch of smoke.'

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