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Carter: Avoid force against terrorism

By
LEE STOKES

CORFU, Greece -- Former President Carter said Sunday it would be 'inappropriate' for President Reagan to use force in combating terrorism.

'The exertion of force against an unknown group of perpetrators of a crime is certainly inappropriate because of the danger of punishing innocent people,' and because of the danger to the safety of possible hostages, Carter said.

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Speaking to reporters at a luxury hotel wherehe spent the weekend as the guest of Prime Minister Andreas Papandreou, Carter said he disagreed with Reagan's assertion there is 'an international conspiracy or collusion among nations themselves or entire populations of countries concerning terrorism.'

'I also disagree with some of the particular countries President Reagan chose to identify to the American Bar Association as supporting terrorism,' he said.

Last week, Reagan denounced Libya, Iran, Cuba, Nicaragua and North Korea as countries which supported terrorism.

Carter said it was a mistake for the 'leader of such a great nation as ours to constantly make threats about the response to future terrorist acts.'

He said in his experience, 'terrorism can be dealt with quietly.'

The former president is on a private visit to Greece. He met Papandreou Saturday and was scheduled to meet President Christos Sartzetakis and Foreign Minister Yannis Haralambopoulos on Monday.

Carter said he was not prepared to attempt to mediate in disputes between Greece and the Reagan administration, which issued an advisory telling Americans to avoid traveling to Athens airport because of lax security.

The travel advisory was issued after Shiite Moslems fundamentalists hijacked TWA Flight 847 from Athens to Rome June 14.

Carter did say he would brief the State Department on his talks with Papandreou and other Greek leaders.

Relations between Athens and Washington are strained because of Papandreou's declared intention to dismantle four U.S. military bases in the county once the agreement under which they operate expires in 1988.

Carter, accompanied by his wife Rosalynn and several aides and security men, is scheduled to fly from Greece to Turkey for talks with Turkish officials this week.

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