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The slogan of the '60s radicals was once, 'Don't...

NEW YORK -- The slogan of the '60s radicals was once, 'Don't trust anyone over 30,' but Abbie Hoffman, 47, now says it may be the other way around.

Hoffman, co-founder of the Youth International Party during the 60s - better known as the 'Yippies' -- told Newsweek Magazine in an interview published Sunday he doubts the commitment of today's students to social change.

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'I'm like a Chinese meal to these students,' Hoffman said. 'An hour after my talk, they're back to watching 'Dallas' and playing video games.

'I think the reason a lot of the young people are against nuclear war is because it would screw up their careers. The situation has been reversed from the '60s. It's now the young people who are cynical and in despair, while the older generation, the '60s people, are the ones working for change.

'I now think it's legitimate to wonder whether people under 30 can be trusted,' said Hoffman.

Hoffman, who spent seven years as a fugitive on cocaine charges, said he came up from underground because he saw young people heading into the era of 'designer brains, and I wanted to tell them fashion isn't everything.'

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Hoffman told the magazine he will soon be on the lecture circuit with Bobby Seale, a former Black Panther leader and his co-defendant in the Chicago Seven antiwar case. The two will talk about black-Jewish relations.

Hoffman was arrested on cocaine charges in 1973 and went underground, working in an environmental group and, on one occasion, testifying before Congress. He surfaced in 1980, pleaded guilty to a lesser charge, and spent a year in jail.

Hoffman lives in a cottage in upstate New York, continues in the environmental movement, and recently published a collection of essays. He told the magazine he owns no stocks, bonds or real estate, 'and I don't even have health insurance.'

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