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Authorities crack down on Solidarity activists

WARSAW, Poland -- Security police announced the arrest of more than 20 Solidarity underground activists, including a previously unknown farmers' resistance group allegedly planning a campaign of violence.

Among the arrests were five high school and university students in the Wroclaw area active in publishing and distributing underground newspapers, state-run news media reported.

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The arrests of several dozen other people, including 16 workers from the Lenin Shipyard in Gdansk, were announced during the weekend. The actions appeared to be part of a campaign aimed at discouraging participation in demonstrations Solidarity has called for Friday.

Maj. Jerzy Karpacz of the security police disclosed the arrest of 13 people around the country, all allegedly members of a group called the National Farmers' Resistance Committee.

'The committee consisted of chosen, determined people,' Karpacz said in an interview with Polish television Monday.

'Their program contained brutal methods of action. They declared they were for 'activeself-defense' in the form of workers' strikes ... and the punishing of certain people (in power).

'They also spoke of taking over power in the country and forming ... shadow cabinets,' he said.

Members were required to swear allegiance to the committee, which supposedly established secret tribunals, similar to those used by the World War II resistance movement, with power to try to sentence violators of human rights.

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Several people active in Radio Solidarity broadcasts in Walbrzych, near Wroclaw, were arrested and a transmitter was confiscated, officials reported. Three printers of underground publications in Katowice also were seized.

In announcing the surrender of nine underground activists who decided to accept the Communist regime's offer of amnesty, the evening television news added: 'State security organs are carrying out intensive actions against those who decided to remain in hiding.'

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