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A dangerous winter storm that reached near-blizzard proportions dumped...

A dangerous winter storm that reached near-blizzard proportions dumped nearly a foot of snow on portions of Nebraska Saturday. At least three people died in traffic accidents on roads made hazardous by ice, heavy winds and drifts.

An earlier storm that spread up to a foot and a half of snow from Illinois to the Carolinas drifted out to sea and another storm that caused mudslides and broughtthe first major snowfall to Southern California moved into Arizona.

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'This is a dangerous winter storm,' the National Weather Service in Nebraska said when it issued a statewide winter storm warning.

Nebraska officials blamed icy pavements for the deaths of a Lincoln woman on Interstate 80 near Lincoln and two Iowans on Nebraska 35 near Dakota City.

The Weather Service told travelers to watch for near-blizzard conditions in parts of southwest and west-central Nebraska. Strong northerly winds of 30 to 40 mph were reported in the vicinity of Lake McConaughy in Keith County, Neb.

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As the snow intensified, strong northerly winds in the western half of the state caused considerable blowing and drifting, which made travel hazardous.

A special weather statement said unofficial reports of snow depths ranged from 8 to 12 inches through the North Platte, Neb., valley from the Wyoming state line eastward to near Oshkosh in the Panhandle.

The storm that pushed over the midlands and the East Friday, closing schools and leaving at least three people dead, moved over the Atlantic early Saturday. But the National Weather Service warned areas hit by the storm that they may have just enough time to dig out. Another storm was on the way.

The latest threat was brooding in the Rockies, building slowly and pushing into the Mississippi Valley Saturday.

The U.S. Forest Service issued an avalanche warning for all of Colorado's mountains through Sunday.

Fifteen avalanches were reported Friday near Berthoud and Loveland Passes, 10 near Aspen, three near Gothic and three near Monarch Pass.

Snow was falling from northeastern Nevada and northern Utah through Montana and Wyoming to western North Dakota.

Lander, Wyo., got 6 inches of snow and Lewistown, Mont., got 3 inches, as did the valleys of southern Idaho.

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To the south, a bitter storm system was brooding over the eastern slopes of the central Rockies.

Light snow and freezing drizzle spread over the high Plains. But the storm was building.

A winter storm warning was posted for western Kansas and travel advisories were posted for parts of Idaho, Wyoming, Colorado and northern New Mexico.

Winter storm watches were in effect from southwestern Nebraska to eastern Kansas and eastward to Missouri, Wisconsin and Michigan.

North Carolina and Tennessee were the hardest hit by Friday's snowstorm.

Roan Mountain, N.C., was buried in 18 inches of snow, while Mount Mitchell had 14 inches and Boone had 9. The Smokey Mountains in Tennessee reported 10 inches. A half-foot of snow blanketed the breadth of Kentucky and up to 5 inches fell in Virginia.

Scores of schools in Virginia, Kentucky, Tennessee and Illinois called off classes Friday because of snow-packed, ice-covered roads.

And forecasters said the new storm, if it lives up to its full potential, might hit in time to give children another day off Monday.

Friday's storm hit North Carolina with little warning and covered all but the extreme southwest portion of the state with snow. Banks shut down and schools closed early.

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But the snows did little to relieve a dry spell in Kentucky. The weather bureau said this month will go on record as Kentucky's driest January ever.

The Weather Service told travelers to watch for near-blizzard conditions in parts of southwest and west-central Nebraska. Strong northerly winds of 30 to 40 mph were reported in the vicinity of Lake McConaughy in Keith County, Neb.

As the snow intensified, strong northerly winds in the western half of the state caused considerable blowing and drifting, which made travel hazardous.

A special weather statement said unofficial reports of snow depths ranged from 8 to 12 inches through the North Platte, Neb., valley from the Wyoming state line eastward to near Oshkosh in the Panhandle.

The storm that pushed over the midlands and the East Friday, closing schools and leaving at least three people dead, moved over the Atlantic early Saturday. But the National Weather Service warned areas hit by the storm that they may have just enough time to dig out. Another storm was on the way.

The latest threat was brooding in the Rockies, building slowly and pushing into the Mississippi Valley Saturday.

The U.S. Forest Service issued an avalanche warning for all of Colorado's mountains through Sunday.

Advertisement

Fifteen avalanches were reported Friday near Berthoud and Loveland Passes, 10 near Aspen, three near Gothic and three near Monarch Pass.

Snow was falling from northeastern Nevada and northern Utah through Montana and Wyoming to western North Dakota.

Lander, Wyo., got 6 inches of snow and Lewistown, Mont., got 3 inches, as did the valleys of southern Idaho.

To the south, a bitter storm system was brooding over the eastern slopes of the central Rockies.

Light snow and freezing drizzle spread over the high Plains. But the storm was building.

A winter storm warning was posted for western Kansas and travel advisories were posted for parts of Idaho, Wyoming, Colorado and northern New Mexico.

Winter storm watches were in effect from southwestern Nebraska to eastern Kansas and eastward to Missouri, Wisconsin and Michigan.

North Carolina and Tennessee were the hardest hit by Friday's snowstorm.

Roan Mountain, N.C., was buried in 18 inches of snow, while Mount Mitchell had 14 inches and Boone had 9. The Smokey Mountains in Tennessee reported 10 inches. A half-foot of snow blanketed the breadth of Kentucky and up to 5 inches fell in Virginia.

Scores of schools in Virginia, Kentucky, Tennessee and Illinois called off classes Friday because of snow-packed, ice-covered roads.

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And forecasters said the new storm, if it lives up to its full potential, might hit in time to give children another day off Monday.

Friday's storm hit North Carolina with little warning and covered all but the extreme southwest portion of the state with snow. Banks shut down and schools closed early.

But the snows did little to relieve a dry spell in Kentucky. The weather bureau said this month will go on record as Kentucky's driest January ever.

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