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Khrushchev says relations are warming

President Dwight D. Eisenhower and Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev pose in front of Aspen Lodge at Camp David, Maryland, in September 1959. Photo by United States Navy via NPS
President Dwight D. Eisenhower and Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev pose in front of Aspen Lodge at Camp David, Maryland, in September 1959. Photo by United States Navy via NPS

WASHINGTON, Sept. 17, 1959 (UPI) Toasting his "good friend" the President with a goblet of champagne, Khrushchev predicted that his meeting with Eisenhower would lead to "a warm spell in international relations."

Eisenhower, replying with a champagne toast of his own, expressed hope that the talks "mean at least the beginning of that melting of the ice of which Mr. Khrushchev speaks."

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The leaders exchanged the sentiments at the end of Khrushchev's dinner for President and Mrs. Eisenhower and top U.S. officials in the "Golden Hall" of the Soviet Embassy.

The menu included Ukrainian borscht, Caucasian shashlik, and caviar, served on gold-plated dishes borrowed from the Mayflower Hotel. Vodka and two kinds of Russian wine were served during a cocktail hour and vodka and four types of wine were on the U-shaped table for dinner.

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After the dinner, Eisenhower and Khrushchev engaged in a "general discussion" of world problems.

Vice President Richard M. Nixon said afterwards there had been no change in either country's position as a result of the conversation. "You never get a change at a party like this," Nixon said.

In his friendly, sometimes witty toast, Khrushchev said, "The ice of the cold war has not only already shown signs of a crack, but has started to crumble.

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"I believe that by joint effort we will reach the objective and will really melt the ice and create normal conditions of life for our peoples and good friendly relations between our states."

Raising his glass at the end of the toast, the Soviet leader declared, "To your health, dear guests. To all those present here, although this wine is cold, may our relations become warmer."

Khrushchev said that although he was having a "very good" time in the United States he could not prolong his visit because he had to fly to Red China shortly after his return to Moscow. He added that he was not going to China for "a secret collusion."

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