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Nazis seek to calm people, say Allied invasion is nowhere near

By JOSEPH W. GRIGG

LONDON, June 3, 1944 (UP) - The Berlin radio Saturday night began broadcasting reports that the "invasion is nowhere near."

Apparently fearing German nerves would be unable to stand the double strain of day and night bombing from the east, west and south and the threat of invasion, German Propaganda Minister Joseph Goebbels' radio experts who had been predicting the drive into Europe would come any day suddenly switched tactics and said it would not come for some time.

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Berlin offered the explanation that "D-day" was fixed for a few days before Whit Sunday last week but claimed that it was "called off by Roosevelt." However, according to Stockholm reports, the German press was warning the people that "exceptional circumstances" may cause a stoppage of all private telegraph traffic.

Here in Britain, Supreme Allied Commander Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower sent a message to salute the Soldier week gathering, saying:

"Never in the history of the United Nations has it been more vital that every single one of us, whether in civil life or the armed forces, should make his greatest effort now in the name of peace and freedom."

It was revealed that thousands of portable packs, each containing sufficient supplies to last 30 men 21 days were being distributed to units of the Allied Expeditionary Force.

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