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Ruth Law lands on Governor's Island after flight from Chicago

Ruth Law lands on Governor's Island after flight from Chicago
Aviator Ruth Law, ca. 1915, at the controls of Curtiss Pusher, with Wright Brothers produced control levers. Ms. Law became the first enlisted Army aviatrix on June 30, 1917, enjoying one of the longest and most colorful careers of early female aviators. File Photo courtesy Lt. H.M. Benner Hommondsport/USAF

NEW YORK, Nov. 20, 1916 (UP) - Ruth Law took her place as the premier woman aviator of the world to-day, when she broke the American record for cross-country flying.

She landed at Governor's Island at 9:38 a.m., having flown 950 miles from Chicago in an old style exhibition aeroplane.

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Miss Law made two stops. These were at Hornell and Binghamton, N.Y., last night, when she was forced to alight because she had run out of gasoline.

Fully exposed to the wind and cold, owing to the fact that the type of machine she drove forced her to sit out in front of her motor without any shield for protection, the plucky young woman outstripped Victor Carlstrom's record for continuous cross-country flight made on November 2nd in the very latest type of machine, and then continued her journey and flew further than has any woman before in history.

Miss Law left Chicago at 7:25 a.m. (Central time) Sunday. She reached Binghamton - 590 miles away - at 4:20 p.m. and resumed her flight early this morning.

Her flying time for the entire trip was 8 hours and 59 minutes.

Miss Law landed on the island, completing her Chicago-to-New York flight, at 9:38. She left Binghamton, N.Y., at 7:20 this morning.

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Miss Law's feat was accomplished on the anniversary of the day she received her pilot's license, November 20, 1912. Being a sister of Rodman Law, the famous broad jumper, she had plenty of family nerve to help her when she decided to do stunts with a flying machine. This is the first distance flight she ever attempted, but she has been making records for some time. She broke the altitude record for women on May 27th last, when she climbed 11,200 feet. Victor Carlstrom, on this occasion, tried for an altitude record in a baby scout 'plane, but arose only 9,000 feet.

Accompanied by Miss Pearl McGrath and Richard R. Sinclair of New York, she established a record for height with two passengers, on September 3, 1914, arising 800 feet and remaining in the air for ten minutes.

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