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Peace hope in Balkans fades

Peace hope in Balkans fades
Bulgarian General Mihail Savov and Chief of Staff Col. Bournof at ‚atalca, Turkey during the Balkan Wars, ca. 1913. File Photo by Library of Congress/UPI

LONDON, Oct. 8, 1908 (UP) - Irreconcilable differences between the great powers as to the program for the proposed international conference to revise the treaty of Berlin, now loom up as the most serious menace in the Balkan situation.

Dispatches from the various chancellories show that the powers are hopelessly clashing and the prospects of a peaceful conference momentarily decreasing.

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The present crisis bids fair to disrupt the new understanding between England, France and Russia.

The British foreign office announces that it will not agree to the consideration of any features of the treaty except the existing issues, which would preclude the possibility of Russia gaining free access to the Bosphorus and Dardanelles.

France and Russia are demanding a complete revision of the treaty, an entirely new treaty, in fact, giving them a larger share of the Balkan advantages.

Turkey has indicated that she will insist on a heavy compensation for the loss of Bosnia and Herzegovina, and says that unless the conference is held and her demands granted, she will act herself.

Germany and Austria ridicule the idea of the annexation being set aside, and declare that they will not join in the conference unless the other powers accept their position that the treaty has not been violated by Austria's action.

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Unless Austria beats an ignominious retreat from her present position, Turkey will declare war, according to a member of the Turkish embassy.

Crete has announced to the powers that she has thrown off the yoke of Turkish suzerainty, established by them, and has joined Greece.

Her movement complicates the European situation, for Crete has been under the espionage of the powers since 1898, after a series of insurrections.

The Moslem residents of Crete have armed themselves and are pouring into Canea, threatening to undo the secession from Turkey. A clash between them and the adherents of the Greek church is imminent.

The Moslems fear that a union with Greece will result in a restriction of their religious liberties. The Moslems, however, are greatly outnumbered.

Albania has declared her independence of Turkey, according to a report that reached Vienna Thursday. Albania is a mountainous country of European Turkey, bordering on the Adriatic. It has a population of about 2,000,000 and became affected with the secession spirit during the troubles that prevented the granting of a Turkish constitution.

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