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Court divided on affirmative action

WASHINGTON, April 1 (UPI) -- The Bush administration's top courtroom lawyer, Solicitor General Theodore Olson, told a closely divided Supreme Court Tuesday that admissions policies at the U
MICHAEL KIRKLAND and MARK BENJAMIN

Analysis: Murky affirmative action

WASHINGTON, March 31 (UPI) -- The Supreme Court will hear argument Tuesday on whether using a race as a factor in admissions at the University of Michigan violates the Constitution. But any final decisions in the two cases -- one covering undergraduate admissions, the other Law School
MICHAEL KIRKLAND, UPI Legal Affairs Correspondent

Analysis: Same-sex case pits precedents

WASHINGTON, March 25 (UPI) -- Even as the fighting goes on in Iraq, America's culture war continues, and as usual the battlefield for that war is the Supreme Court of the United States.
MICHAEL KIRKLAND, UPI Legal Affairs Correspondent

Court rules against RRs in asbestos case

WASHINGTON, March 10 (UPI) -- The Supreme Court ruled 5-4 Monday that a railroad worker suffering from an asbestos-related injury can sue an employer for mental anguish under federal law.
MICHAEL KIRKLAND, UPI Legal Affairs Correspondent

Common sense of judges questioned

WASHINGTON, March 7 (UPI) -- Let us speak of Leandro Andrade and Gary Albert Ewing.
MICHAEL KIRKLAND, UPI Legal Affairs Correspondent

Court upholds Conn. 'Megan's law'

WASHINGTON, March 5 (UPI) -- The Supreme Court Wednesday upheld the Alaska and Connecticut versions of "Megan's law," which requires public registration of prior sex offenders.
MICHAEL KIRKLAND, UPI Legal Affairs Correspondent

Court upholds Calif.'s '3-strikes' law

WASHINGTON, March 5 (UPI) -- The Supreme Court, in two 5-4 votes Wednesday, upheld California's "Three Strikes and You're Out" law, saying it did not violate the Eighth Amendment's ban on cruel and unusual punishment. The rulings came in cases in which two repeat offenders were sente
MICHAEL KIRKLAND, UPI Legal Affairs Correspondent

Court rules for White Mountain Apache

WASHINGTON, March 4 (UPI) -- The Supreme Court ruled 5-4 Tuesday that the federal government can be held liable for conditions at Fort Apache, Ariz.
MICHAEL KIRKLAND, UPI Legal Affairs Correspondent

Court rules against NOW in RICO case

WASHINGTON, Feb. 26 (UPI) -- The Supreme Court ruled 8-1 Wednesday that nationwide abortion protesters did not violate federal racketeering law by trying to shut down women's clinics.
MICHAEL KIRKLAND, UPI Legal Affairs Correspondent

Scalia has shoulder surgery

WASHINGTON, Feb. 21 (UPI) -- Justice Antonin Scalia underwent surgery for a torn right rotator cuff Thursday at Arlington, the Supreme Court said Friday.

On Law: Divided high court returns to work

WASHINGTON, Feb. 21 (UPI) -- The Supreme Court returns Monday from a long winter's break.
MICHAEL KIRKLAND, UPI Legal Affairs Correspondent

On Law: Three decades of Roe

WASHINGTON, Jan. 17 (UPI) -- On Jan. 22, 1973, the Supreme Court had something profound to say about abortion in the case of a Texas woman who had been denied one.
MICHAEL KIRKLAND, UPI Legal Affairs Correspondent

Rehnquist returns to Supreme Court

WASHINGTON, Jan. 13 (UPI) -- Chief Justice William Rehnquist returned to the Supreme Court bench Monday after recovering from a knee injury.

Rehnquist returns to Supreme Court

WASHINGTON, Jan. 13 (UPI) --

Report: Huge advance for Thomas book

WASHINGTON, Jan. 9 (UPI) -- Justice Clarence Thomas will receive a seven-figure publisher's advance for his memoirs, a newspaper report said Thursday.
Page 10 of 16
Photos
William Rehnquist
Supreme Court Chief Justice William Rehnquist leaves his home in Arlington, Virginia on July 11, 2005. Widespread rumors and speculation continue in regards to Rehnquist and his possible retirement. (UPI Photo/Kevin Dietsch)
Wiki

William Hubbs Rehnquist (October 1, 1924 – September 3, 2005) was an American lawyer, jurist, and political figure who served as an Associate Justice on the Supreme Court of the United States and later as the 16th Chief Justice of the United States. Considered a conservative, Rehnquist favored a conception of federalism that emphasized the Tenth Amendment's reservation of powers to the states. Under this view of federalism, the Supreme Court of the United States, for the first time since the 1930s, struck down an Act of Congress as exceeding federal power under the Commerce Clause.

Rehnquist presided as Chief Justice for nearly 19 years, making him the fourth-longest-serving Chief Justice after John Marshall, Roger Taney, and Melville Fuller, and the longest-serving Chief Justice who had previously served as an Associate Justice. The last 11 years of Rehnquist's term as Chief Justice (1994–2005) marked the second-longest tenure of a single unchanging roster of the Supreme Court.

Rehnquist was born William Donald Rehnquist in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, on October 1, 1924. He grew up in the suburb of Shorewood. His father, William Benjamin Rehnquist, was a paper salesman; his mother, Margery Peck Rehnquist, was a translator and homemaker. Rehnquist changed his middle name to Hubbs, a family name, because a numerologist told his mother he would be successful with a middle initial of H. His paternal grandparents emigrated from Sweden.

This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License.
It uses material from the Wikipedia article "William Rehnquist."
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