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Tampa Bay tries for first Super Bowl trip

PHILADELPHIA, Jan. 18 (UPI) -- The Philadelphia Eagles host the Tampa Bay Buccaneers Sunday with the NFC championship on the line and everything -- history, location and weather -- will be wo

Laura Bush to lead 'Concert for America'

WASHINGTON, Sept. 4 (UPI) -- With first lady Laura Bush as honorary chair, plans are under way for the "Concert for America," an all-star production at the John F. Kennedy Center for the Pe

Eakins exhibition is a Realist treat

NEW YORK, July 23 (UPI) -- A blockbuster retrospective exhibition of 150 paintings, photographs, and sculpture by Thomas Eakins reveals more about the 19th century giant of American art t
FREDERICK M. WINSHIP

The Almanac

Today is Saturday, June 29, the 180th day of 2002 with 185 to follow.
By United Press International

The almanac

Today is Friday, June 14, the 165th day of 2002 with 200 to follow.
By United Press International

The almanac

Today is Friday, May 31, the 151st day of 2002 with 214 to follow.
By United Press International

A mother's legacy called into question

MAPLEWOOD, N.J., Nov. 24 (UPI) -- "Having Faith -- An Ecologist's Journey to Motherhood,Ó by Sandra Steingraber, Ph.D., Perseus Publishing, November 2001, 352 pages, ISBN: 0-7382-0467-6.
MARY ANN SWISSLER

Brave new mothers

"Having Faith -- An Ecologist's Journey to Motherhood,Ó by Sandra Steingraber, Ph.D., Perseus Publishing, November 2001, 352 pages, ISBN: 0-7382-0467-6.
MARY ANN SWISSLER, UPI Science News

New York: The target called 'Ground Zero'

NEW YORK, Oct. 19 (UPI) -- It was a perfect target, this place they now call Ground Zero.

Exhibition of Red Grooms' Graphics Tours

NEW YORK, Oct. 3 (UPI) -- Artist Red Grooms has been creating graphics in an array of printmaking techniques since 1956, taking a two-dimensional medium into the third dimension that giv
FREDERICK M. WINSHIP

Book Review: CEO of the Sofa

WASHINGTON, Oct. 1 (UPI) -- The master of contemporary American humor writing has triumphed again.
PETER ROFF, UPI National Political Analyst
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Walt Whitman
An early portrait of Walt Whitman is on display as part of the Library of Congress' exhibition on Whitman, "Revising Himself," on May 16, 2005, in Washington. The Southwest Gallery of the Jefferson Building houses the exhibit through December 3 as part of the 150th anniversary celebration of Whitman's "Leaves of Grass." (UPI Photo/Roger L. Wollenberg)
Wiki

Walter "Walt" Whitman (May 31, 1819 – March 26, 1892) was an American poet, essayist and journalist. A humanist, he was a part of the transition between transcendentalism and realism, incorporating both views in his works. Whitman is among the most influential poets in the American canon, often called the father of free verse. His work was very controversial in its time, particularly his poetry collection Leaves of Grass, which was described as obscene for its overt sexuality.

Born on Long Island, Whitman worked as a journalist, a teacher, a government clerk, and–in addition to publishing his poetry–was a volunteer nurse during the American Civil War. Early in his career, he also produced a temperance novel, Franklin Evans (1842). Whitman's major work, Leaves of Grass, was first published in 1855 with his own money. The work was an attempt at reaching out to the common person with an American epic. He continued expanding and revising it until his death in 1892. After a stroke towards the end of his life, he moved to Camden, New Jersey, where his health further declined. He died at age 72 and his funeral became a public spectacle.

Whitman's sexuality is often discussed alongside his poetry. Though biographers continue to debate his sexuality, he is usually described as either homosexual or bisexual in his feelings and attractions. However, there is disagreement among biographers as to whether Whitman had actual sexual experiences with men. Whitman was concerned with politics throughout his life. He supported the Wilmot Proviso and opposed the extension of slavery generally. His poetry presented an egalitarian view of the races, and at one point he called for the abolition of slavery, but later he saw the abolitionist movement as a threat to democracy.

This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License.
It uses material from the Wikipedia article "Walt Whitman."
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