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The Almanac

Today is Thursday, June 29, the 180th day of 2006 with 185 to follow.
By United Press International

The Almanac

Today is Wednesday, June 14, the 165th day of 2006 with 200 to follow.
By United Press International

The Almanac

Today is Wednesday, May 31, the 151st day of 2006 with 214 to follow.
By United Press International

The Almanac

Today is Wednesday, June 29, the 180th day of 2005 with 185 to follow.
By United Press International

The Almanac

Today is Tuesday, June 14, the 165th day of 2005 with 200 to follow.
By United Press International

The Almanac

Today is Tuesday, May 31, the 151st day of 2005 with 214 to follow.
By United Press International

The Almanac

Today is Tuesday, June 29, the 181st day of 2004 with 185 to follow.
By United Press International

The Almanac

Today is Monday, June 14, the 166th day of 2004 with 200 to follow.
By United Press International

The Almanac

Today is Monday, May 31, the 152nd day of 2004 with 214 to follow.
By United Press International

The Almanac

Today is Sunday, June 29, the 180th day of 2003 with 185 to follow.
By United Press International

The Almanac

Today is Saturday, June 14, the 165th day of 2003 with 200 to follow.
By United Press International

The Almanac

Today is Saturday, May 31, the 151st day of 2003 with 214 to follow.
By United Press International

Buglisi/Foreman Dance bridges cultures

NEW YORK, March 17 (UPI) -- The 10-year-old Buglisi/Foreman Dance company has a reputation for bridging cultural boundaries by producing such works the Chinese-inspired "Sacred Currents Through Bamboo," which has just had its world premiere at the Joyce Theater.
FREDERICK M. WINSHIP

Think tanks wrap-up

WASHINGTON, March 10 (UPI) -- The UPI think tank wrap-up is a daily digest covering opinion pieces, reactions to recent news events and position statements released by various think tanks. This is the first of two wrap-ups for March 10.

Entertainment Today: Showbiz News

The White House has postponed a literary symposium after numerous poets said they would use the event to speak out against war with Iraq.
KAREN BUTLER, United Press International
Page 2 of 3
Photos
Walt Whitman
An early portrait of Walt Whitman is on display as part of the Library of Congress' exhibition on Whitman, "Revising Himself," on May 16, 2005, in Washington. The Southwest Gallery of the Jefferson Building houses the exhibit through December 3 as part of the 150th anniversary celebration of Whitman's "Leaves of Grass." (UPI Photo/Roger L. Wollenberg)
Wiki

Walter "Walt" Whitman (May 31, 1819 – March 26, 1892) was an American poet, essayist and journalist. A humanist, he was a part of the transition between transcendentalism and realism, incorporating both views in his works. Whitman is among the most influential poets in the American canon, often called the father of free verse. His work was very controversial in its time, particularly his poetry collection Leaves of Grass, which was described as obscene for its overt sexuality.

Born on Long Island, Whitman worked as a journalist, a teacher, a government clerk, and–in addition to publishing his poetry–was a volunteer nurse during the American Civil War. Early in his career, he also produced a temperance novel, Franklin Evans (1842). Whitman's major work, Leaves of Grass, was first published in 1855 with his own money. The work was an attempt at reaching out to the common person with an American epic. He continued expanding and revising it until his death in 1892. After a stroke towards the end of his life, he moved to Camden, New Jersey, where his health further declined. He died at age 72 and his funeral became a public spectacle.

Whitman's sexuality is often discussed alongside his poetry. Though biographers continue to debate his sexuality, he is usually described as either homosexual or bisexual in his feelings and attractions. However, there is disagreement among biographers as to whether Whitman had actual sexual experiences with men. Whitman was concerned with politics throughout his life. He supported the Wilmot Proviso and opposed the extension of slavery generally. His poetry presented an egalitarian view of the races, and at one point he called for the abolition of slavery, but later he saw the abolitionist movement as a threat to democracy.

This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License.
It uses material from the Wikipedia article "Walt Whitman."
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