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The Almanac

Today is Friday, June 6, the 157th day of 2003 with 208 to follow.
By United Press International

Washington Agenda-General

UNITED PRESS INTERNATIONAL
By United Press International

New election law may transform nonprofits

WASHINGTON, Jan. 8 (UPI) -- A federal law aimed at curtailing the negative effects of unregulated donations on federal elections will reshape the relationship between political organizatio
CHRISTIAN BOURGE, UPI Think Tanks Correspondent

Experts debate campaign finance law

WASHINGTON, Dec. 18 (UPI) -- The outcome of the current legal challenge of the McCain-Feingold campaign finance reform law passed earlier this year will be the most important decision on campaign law in decades, analysts on both sides of the issue said Wednesday.
CHRISTIAN BOURGE, UPI Think Tank Correspondent

Washington Agenda-General

UNITED PRESS INTERNATIONAL
By United Press International

Book distribution to WWII GIs revived

NEW YORK, Dec. 11 (UPI) -- A project that distributed 120 million free copies of books to American GIs in World War II has been revived by three publishing firms that have already printed four books in the same oblong "cargo pocket" editions for servicemen on duty in the worldwide
FREDERICK M. WINSHIP

Washington Agenda-Federal

UNITED PRESS INTERNATIONAL
By United Press International

Washington Agenda-Weekahead

UNITED PRESS INTERNATIONAL
By United Press International

Library opens door to 'curiosity cabinets'

NEW YORK, July 31 (UPI) -- The New York Public Library has recreated a Renaissance-style "cabinet of curiosities" in an unusual display of objects from its vast trove of rarely seen oddities and treasures donated by collectors over a period of 150 years.
FREDERICK M. WINSHIP

Washington Agenda-Weekahead

By United Press International

Washington Agenda-General

For content questions, call 202-898-8291
By United Press International

The Almanac

Today is Thursday, June 6, the 157th day of 2002 with 208 to follow.
By United Press International

Feature: Smells and bells in Luther's land

GURAT, France, April 4 (UPI) -- "The Germans are always late," Thomas Mann quipped about his fellow-countrymen. Could it be that changes in Lutheran liturgy are proving him right?
UWE SIEMON-NETTO, UPI Religion Correspondent

Washington Agenda - Federal Agencies

By United Press International

Washington Agenda - General News Events

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By United Press International
Page 2 of 3
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Thomas Mann
Thomas Mann arrives for the premiere of "It's Kind of a Funny Story" at the Landmark Sunshine Cinema in New York on September 14, 2010. UPI /Laura Cavanaugh
Wiki

Thomas Mann (6 June 1875 – 12 August 1955) was a German novelist, short story writer, social critic, philanthropist, essayist, and 1929 Nobel Prize laureate, known for his series of highly symbolic and ironic epic novels and novellas, noted for their insight into the psychology of the artist and the intellectual. His analysis and critique of the European and German soul used modernized German and Biblical stories, as well as the ideas of Goethe, Nietzsche, and Schopenhauer. His older brother was the radical writer Heinrich Mann, and three of his six children, Erika Mann, Klaus Mann and Golo Mann, also became important German writers. When Hitler came to power in 1933, the anti-fascist Mann fled to Switzerland. When World War II broke out in 1939, he emigrated to the United States, from where he returned to Switzerland in 1952. Thomas Mann is one of the most known exponents of the so called Exilliteratur.

Mann was born Paul Thomas Mann in Lübeck, Germany and was the second son of Thomas Johann Heinrich Mann (a senator and a grain merchant), and his wife Júlia da Silva Bruhns (a Brazilian with partially German ancestry who emigrated to Germany when seven years old). His mother was Roman Catholic, but Mann was baptised into his father's Lutheran faith. Mann's father died in 1891, and his trading firm was liquidated. The family subsequently moved to Munich. Mann attended the science division of a Lübeck gymnasium, then spent time at the Ludwig Maximillians University of Munich and Technical University of Munich where, in preparation for a journalism career, he studied history, economics, art history, and literature. He lived in Munich from 1891 until 1933, with the exception of a year in Palestrina, Italy, with his novelist elder brother Heinrich. Thomas worked with the South German Fire Insurance Company 1894–95. His career as a writer began when he wrote for Simplicissimus. Mann's first short story, "Little Herr Friedemann" (Der Kleine Herr Friedemann), was published in 1898.

In 1905, he married Katia Pringsheim, daughter of a prominent, secular Jewish family of intellectuals. They had six children:

This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License.
It uses material from the Wikipedia article "Thomas Mann."
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