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UPI Almanac for Thursday, Dec. 26, 2013.
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UPI Almanac for Wednesday, Dec. 26, 2012.
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UPI Almanac for Monday, Dec. 26, 2011.
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UPI Almanac for Friday, Dec. 26, 2008.
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UPI Almanac for Wednesday, Dec. 26, 2007.
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UPI almanac for Tuesday, Dec. 26, 2006.
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Today is Monday, Dec. 26, the 360th day of 2005 with five to follow.
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Today is Sunday, Dec. 26, the 361st day of 2004 with five to follow.
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Today is Friday, Dec. 26, the 360th day of 2003 with five to follow.
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The Almanac

Today is Thursday, Dec. 26, the 360th day of 2002 with five to follow.
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The Almanac

Today is Wednesday, Dec. 26, the 360th day of 2001 with five to follow.
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Wiki

Thomas Gray (26 December 1716 – 30 July 1771) was an English poet, classical scholar and professor at Cambridge University.

Thomas Gray was born in Cornhill, London, the son of an exchange broker and a milliner. He was the fifth of 12 children and the only child of Philip and Dorothy Gray to survive infancy. He lived with his mother after she left his abusive father. He was educated at Eton College where his uncle was one of the masters. He recalled his schooldays as a time of great happiness, as is evident in his Ode on a Distant Prospect of Eton College. Gray was a delicate and naturally scholarly boy who spent his time reading great literature and avoiding athletics. It was probably fortunate for the young and sensitive Gray that he was able to live in his uncle’s household rather than at college. He made three close friends at Eton: Horace Walpole, son of Prime Minister Robert Walpole, Thomas Ashton, and Richard West. The four of them prided themselves on their sense of style, their sense of humour, and their appreciation of beauty.

In 1734 Gray went up to Peterhouse, Cambridge. He found the curriculum dull. He wrote letters to his friends listing all the things he disliked: the masters ("mad with Pride") and the Fellows ("sleepy, drunken, dull, illiterate Things.") Supposedly he was intended for the law, but in fact he spent his time as an undergraduate reading classical and modern literature and playing Vivaldi and Scarlatti on the harpsichord for relaxation. In 1738 he accompanied his old school-friend Walpole on his Grand Tour, probably at Walpole's expense. They fell out and parted in Tuscany because Walpole wanted to attend fashionable parties and Gray wanted to visit all the antiquities. However, they were reconciled a few years later. Then, he wished his poems would become more popular.

This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License.
It uses material from the Wikipedia article "Thomas Gray."
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