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The almanac

UPI Almanac for Friday, Oct. 18, 2013.
By United Press International

The almanac

UPI Almanac for Friday, Oct. 11, 2013.
By United Press International

The almanac

UPI Almanac for Thursday, Oct. 18, 2012.
By United Press International

The almanac

UPI Almanac for Thursday, Oct. 11, 2012.
By United Press International

The almanac

UPI Almanac for Tuesday, Oct. 18, 2011.
By United Press International

The almanac

UPI Almanac for Tuesday, Oct. 11, 2011.
By United Press International

Light bulbs: The odyssey of a bright idea

WINCHESTER, Va., Sept. 8 (UPI) -- The light bulb dreamed up by Thomas Alva Edison is on its last legs as a product made in the United States, a victim of regulations, General Electric said.

The almanac

UPI Almanac for Saturday, Oct. 11, 2008.
By United Press International

The almanac

UPI Almanac for Thursday, Oct. 18, 2007.
By United Press International

The almanac

UPI Almanac for Thursday, Oct. 11, 2007.
By United Press International

The Almanac

UPI almanac for Wednesday, Oct. 18, 2006.
By United Press International

The Almanac

UPI almanac for Wednesday, Oct. 11, 2006.
By United Press International

The Almanac

Today is Tuesday, Oct. 18, the 291st day of 2005 with 74 to follow.
By United Press International

The Almanac

The weekly UPI Almanac package for Oct. 17-23, 2005.
By United Press International

The Almanac

Today is Tuesday, Oct. 11, the 284th day of 2005 with 81 to follow.
By United Press International
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Wiki

Thomas Alva Edison (February 11, 1847 – October 18, 1931) was an American inventor, scientist, and businessman who developed many devices that greatly influenced life around the world, including the phonograph, the motion picture camera, and a long-lasting, practical electric light bulb. Dubbed "The Wizard of Menlo Park" (now Edison, New Jersey) by a newspaper reporter, he was one of the first inventors to apply the principles of mass production and large teamwork to the process of invention, and therefore is often credited with the creation of the first industrial research laboratory.

Edison is the third most prolific inventor in history, holding 1,093 US patents in his name, as well as many patents in the United Kingdom, France, and Germany. He is credited with numerous inventions that contributed to mass communication and, in particular, telecommunications. These included a stock ticker, a mechanical vote recorder, a battery for an electric car, electrical power, recorded music and motion pictures. His advanced work in these fields was an outgrowth of his early career as a telegraph operator. Edison originated the concept and implementation of electric-power generation and distribution to homes, businesses, and factories – a crucial development in the modern industrialized world. His first power station was on Manhattan Island, New York.

Thomas Edison was born in Milan, Ohio, and grew up in Port Huron, Michigan. He was the seventh and last child of Samuel Ogden Edison, Jr. (1804–96, born in Marshalltown, Nova Scotia, Canada) and Nancy Matthews Elliott (1810–1871). His father had to escape from Canada because he took part in the unsuccessful Mackenzie Rebellion of 1837. Edison considered himself to be of Dutch ancestry. In school, the young Edison's mind often wandered, and his teacher, the Reverend Engle, was overheard calling him "addled". This ended Edison's three months of official schooling. Edison recalled later, "My mother was the making of me. She was so true, so sure of me; and I felt I had something to live for, someone I must not disappoint." His mother homeschooled him. Much of his education came from reading R.G. Parker's School of Natural Philosophy and The Cooper Union. Edison developed hearing problems at an early age. The cause of his deafness has been attributed to a bout of scarlet fever during childhood and recurring untreated middle-ear infections. Around the middle of his career Edison attributed the hearing impairment to being struck on the ears by a train conductor when his chemical laboratory in a boxcar caught fire and he was thrown off the train in Smiths Creek, Michigan, along with his apparatus and chemicals. In his later years he modified the story to say the injury occurred when the conductor, in helping him onto a moving train, lifted him by the ears. Edison's family was forced to move to Port Huron, Michigan, when the railroad bypassed Milan in 1854, but his life there was bittersweet. He sold candy and newspapers on trains running from Port Huron to Detroit, and he sold vegetables to supplement his income. This began Edison's long streak of entrepreneurial ventures as he discovered his talents as a businessman. These talents eventually led him to found 14 companies, including General Electric, which is still in existence as one of the largest publicly traded companies in the world.

This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License.
It uses material from the Wikipedia article "Thomas Alva Edison."
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