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"The Love Guru" premieres in Los Angeles
Telma Hopkins, a cast member in the motion picture comedy "The Love Guru", kisses the Stanley Cup as he attends the premiere of the film at Grauman's Chinese Theatre in the Hollywood section of Los Angeles on June 11, 2008. (UPI Photo/Jim Ruymen)
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Telma Hopkins (born Telma Louise Hopkins, October 28, 1948) is an American singer and television actress. A member of the 1970s’ pop group Tony Orlando and Dawn, she later starred in several television sitcoms, including Bosom Buddies, Gimme a Break!, Family Matters, Getting By and Half & Half.

She started her career as a background singer in Detroit, Michigan, singing on many of the Golden World/Motown hits and working with stars like Isaac Hayes and George Clinton. In the early 70s, she became one of the members of "Dawn" in the pop group, Tony Orlando and Dawn, who were famous for hits such as "Tie a Yellow Ribbon Round the Ole Oak Tree" and "Knock Three Times". In 1974, Tony Orlando and Dawn were given their own variety show on CBS, which lasted until 1976. After Tony Orlando and Dawn broke up in 1977, one of Hopkins' first acting roles was in the ABC miniseries Roots: The Next Generations. Hopkins acting career took off in the 1980s, when she was a regular on the shows Bosom Buddies (as Isabelle Hammond) and Gimme a Break! (as Nell Carter's best friend, and occasional adversary, Addy Wilson). She was also featured on Celebrity Daredevils, Battle of the Network Stars and Circus of the Stars.

In 1989, she was introduced to another generation as restaurant owner Rachel Crawford on the sitcom, Family Matters. She played the role until 1993, when she was given her own show, Getting By. After Getting By was cancelled, Hopkins returned to Family Matters as a semi-regular character until 1997.

This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License.
It uses material from the Wikipedia article "Telma Hopkins."
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