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Jazz Notes: Goings on in the jazz world

Singer Ann Richards, who worked with the Stan Kenton Orchestra in the 1950s, was born in San Diego on this day in 1935. She married Kenton in 1955, two weeks after she turned 20.
KEN FRANCKLING, United Press International

Jazz Notes: Goings on in the jazz world

Saxophonist Julian "Cannonball" Adderley was born this day in 1928 in Tampa, Fla. Aside from two years in the Miles Davis quintet, Adderley spent most of his career in a quintet co-led with his younger brother, trumpeter Nat Adderley.
KEN FRANCKLING, United Press International

Jazz Notes: Goings on in the jazz world

Swing drummer Specs Powell was born this day in 1922 in New York. He recorded with Gerry Mulligan and Teddy Wilson at the Newport Jazz Festival in 1957 and as a member of the Monday Night at Birdland all-star group with Lee Morgan, Curtis Fuller and Hank
KEN FRANCKLING, United Press International

Jazz Notes: Goings on in the jazz world

Clarinetist Edmond Hall was born this day in 1901 in New Orleans. On the New York swing and traditional jazz scene he worked with Henry Allen, Teddy Wilson, Eddie Condon and Louis Armstrong's All-Stars.
KEN FRANCKLING, United Press International

Jazz Notes: Goings on in the jazz world

Today is Dec. 17.
KEN FRANCKLING, United Press International

Jazz Notes: Goings on in the jazz world

Today is Nov. 24.
KEN FRANCKLING, United Press International
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Theodore Shaw "Teddy" Wilson (November 24, 1912 – July 31, 1986) was a jazz pianist from the United States born in Austin, Texas. His sophisticated and elegant style graced the records of many of the biggest names in jazz, including Louis Armstrong, Lena Horne, Benny Goodman, Billie Holiday and Ella Fitzgerald. He is considered one of the most influential jazz pianists of all time.

Wilson studied piano and violin at Tuskegee Institute. After working in the Lawrence "Speed" Webb band, with Louis Armstrong and also "understudying" Earl Hines in Hines's Grand Terrace Cafe Orchestra, Wilson joined Benny Carter's Chocolate Dandies in 1933. In 1935 he joined the Benny Goodman Trio (which consisted of Goodman, Wilson and drummer Gene Krupa, later expanded to the Benny Goodman Quartet with the addition of Lionel Hampton). The trio performed during the big band's intermissions. By joining the trio, Wilson became the first black musician to perform in public with a previously all-white jazz group.

The noted jazz writer and producer John Hammond was instrumental in getting Wilson a contract with Brunswick, starting in 1935, to record hot swing arrangements of the popular songs of the day, with the growing jukebox trade in mind. He recorded fifty hit records with various singers such as Lena Horne and Helen Ward, including many of Billie Holiday's greatest successes. During these years he also took part in many highly regarded sessions with a wide range of important swing musicians, such as Lester Young, Roy Eldridge, Charlie Shavers, Red Norvo, Buck Clayton and Ben Webster.

This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License.
It uses material from the Wikipedia article "Teddy Wilson."
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