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Watch: Nasim Pedrad shows off uncanny Aziz Ansari impression in unaired SNL sketch

Watch: Nasim Pedrad shows off uncanny Aziz Ansari impression in unaired SNL sketch

BURBANK, Calif., Sept. 17 (UPI) --Former SNL player Nasim Pedrad says she always loved playing tiny men on the show and constantly pushed to play "Parks and Recreation" star Aziz Ansari.
Matt Bradwell
50 years after Civil Rights Act, struggle for equality lives on

50 years after Civil Rights Act, struggle for equality lives on

July 2 (UPI) -- Fifty years after the United States banned discrimination with the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the state of equality in America is hardly settled.
Charlene Pacenti
Supreme Court allows religious exemption to contraception mandate

Supreme Court allows religious exemption to contraception mandate

WASHINGTON, June 30 (UPI) --The Supreme Court Monday ruled that employers with religious objections can refuse to pay for insurance coverage for contraception.
Gabrielle Levy
Supreme Court limits, does not forbid union contributions

Supreme Court limits, does not forbid union contributions

June 30 (UPI) -- The Supreme Court ruled partial public employees cannot be required to contribute union dues, less of a blow to public unions than labor groups feared.
Gabrielle Levy
UPI Almanac for Wednesday, June 25, 2014

UPI Almanac for Wednesday, June 25, 2014

UPI Almanac for Wednesday, June 25, 2014
By United Press International
Sotomayor: Race affirmative action works, economic doesn't

Sotomayor: Race affirmative action works, economic doesn't

WASHINGTON, June 23 (UPI) --Sonia Sotomayor defended race-based affirmative action, saying it works to improve diversity in higher education, but geographic or economic status don't.
Gabrielle Levy
U.S. Supreme Court strengthens free speech rights for public employees

U.S. Supreme Court strengthens free speech rights for public employees

WASHINGTON, June 19 (UPI) --The U.S. Supreme Court, in a unanimous decision Thursday, gave additional protection to public employees who testify at trials.
Frances Burns
Supreme Court rules against 'straw' gun purchases

Supreme Court rules against 'straw' gun purchases

WASHINGTON, June 16 (UPI) --The Supreme Court made it harder for people to hide their purchase of a gun, ruling it illegal for a legal gun owner to buy a firearm on behalf of someone else.
Gabrielle Levy
Hillary greets supporters on book tour

Hillary greets supporters on book tour

WASHINGTON, June 14 (UPI) --The Hillary Clinton book tour came to Arlington, Va., as more than 1,000 supporters lined up at Costco to get four seconds with the former Secretary of State.
Gabrielle Levy
Immigrant children must start over at 21, Supreme Court rules

Immigrant children must start over at 21, Supreme Court rules

WASHINGTON, June 9 (UPI) --The Supreme Court narrowly ruled Monday that children who turn 21 while their parents' immigration status is still pending have to go to the back of the line.
Gabrielle Levy
Supreme Court backs prayer in town meetings

Supreme Court backs prayer in town meetings

WASHINGTON, May 5 (UPI) -- The Supreme Court cleared the path for religious prayers given during government activity, so long as the government was not seen as coercing participation.
Gabrielle Levy
Supreme Court ruling jeopardizes federal 'rails to trails' bike program

Supreme Court ruling jeopardizes federal 'rails to trails' bike program

WASHINGTON, March 10 (UPI) -- Justices ruled 8 to 1 against the federal government in a decision that jeopardizes the legality of other federal "rails-to-trails" bike programs.
Brooks Hays

Supreme Court ruling in land case could be trouble for public trails

WASHINGTON, March 10 (UPI) -- The U.S. Supreme Court ruled Monday easements for private land used for railroad beds expire when the railroads go out of business and revert to landowners.

Supreme Court rules for whistleblowers in challenge to Sarbanes-Oxley

WASHINGTON, March 4 (UPI) -- Whistleblowers at privately held companies are protected from firing if their employers contract with public companies, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled Tuesday.
Little Sisters jab, still no KO

Little Sisters jab, still no KO

WASHINGTON, Feb. 2 (UPI) -- A U.S. Supreme Court order late last month protecting the Little Sisters of the Poor from the immediate effects of the Affordable Care Act's contraception mandate is being hailed as a triumph for the religious order. But the outcome may leave the average person wondering what has been gained.
MICHAEL KIRKLAND, UPI Senior Legal Affairs Writer
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Sonia Sotomayor
Supreme Court nominee Sonia Sotomayor appears before the Senate Judiciary Committee during the fourth day of her confirmation hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington on July 16, 2009. (UPI Photo/Kevin Dietsch)
Wiki

Sonia Maria Sotomayor (English pronunciation: /ˈsoʊnjə ˌsoʊtoʊmaɪˈjɔr/, Spanish: ; born June 25, 1954) is an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States, serving since August 2009. Sotomayor is the Court's 111th justice, its first Hispanic justice, and its third female justice.

Sotomayor was born in The Bronx, New York City and is of Puerto Rican descent. Her father died when she was nine, and she was subsequently raised by her mother. Sotomayor graduated with an A.B., summa cum laude, from Princeton University in 1976 and received her J.D. from Yale Law School in 1979, where she was an editor at the Yale Law Journal. She was an advocate for the hiring of Latino faculty at both schools. She worked as an assistant district attorney in New York for five years before entering private practice in 1984. She played an active role on the boards of directors for the Puerto Rican Legal Defense and Education Fund, the State of New York Mortgage Agency, and the New York City Campaign Finance Board.

Sotomayor was nominated to the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York by President George H. W. Bush in 1991, and her nomination was confirmed in 1992. In 1995, she issued a preliminary injunction against Major League Baseball which ended the 1994 baseball strike. Sotomayor made a ruling allowing the Wall Street Journal to publish Vince Foster's final note. In 1997, she was nominated by President Bill Clinton to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit. Her nomination was slowed by the Republican majority in the Senate, but she was eventually confirmed in 1998. On the Second Circuit, Sotomayor heard appeals in more than 3,000 cases and wrote about 380 opinions. Sotomayor has taught at the New York University School of Law and Columbia Law School.

This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License.
It uses material from the Wikipedia article "Sonia Sotomayor."
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