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Hollywood remembers Vernon Scott

LOS ANGELES, Feb. 22 (UPI) -- Scores of film and TV professionals gathered in Los Angeles Saturday to honor UPI Hollywood reporter Vernon Scott, who died at 79 of cardiac arrest last Novembe
PAT NASON, UPI Hollywood Reporter

The Almanac

Today is Sunday, Nov. 24, the 328th day of 2002 with 37 to follow.
By United Press International

Today in Music: a look back at pop music

Today's birthdays include composer Scott Joplin, "king of ragtime," born in 1858; Jim Yester of the Association, who was born in 1939 (age 63); bassist Donald "Duck" Dunn of the Mar-Keys, Booker T and the M-Gs, and the Blues Brothers, and Pete Best -- the
By United Press International

Jazz Notes: Goings on in the jazz world

Pianist and composer Scott Joplin, the man known as the King of Ragtime, was born this day in 1868 in Texarkana, Texas. He died in New York in 1917.
KEN FRANCKLING, United Press International

Today in Music: a look back at pop music

The weekly UPI Today in Music package for Nov. 23-29.
By United Press International

Washington Agenda-Federal

For content questions, call 202-898-8291
By United Press International

News from the entertainment capital

WRITERS GUILD HONORS KNOPF The Writers Guild of America, west, announced Friday that it will present the rarely given Edmund H. North Award to TV writer Christopher Knopf at the upcoming 54th annual WGA awards program on March 2.
PAT NASON, UPI Hollywood Reporter

The Almanac

Today is Saturday, Nov. 24, the 328th day of 2001 with 37 to follow.
By United Press International

Jazz Notes: Goings on in the jazz world

Today is Nov. 24.
KEN FRANCKLING, United Press International
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Wiki

Scott Joplin (between July 1867 and January 1868 – April 1, 1917) was an African-American composer and pianist, born near Texarkana, Texas, into the first post-slavery generation. He achieved fame for his unique ragtime compositions, and was dubbed the "King of Ragtime." During his brief career, he wrote forty-four original ragtime pieces, one ragtime ballet, and two operas. One of his first pieces, the "Maple Leaf Rag", became ragtime's first and most influential hit, and remained so for a century.

He was "blessed with an amazing ability to improvise at the piano," writes opera historian Elise Kirk, and was able to enlarge his talents "with the music he heard around him," which was rich with the sounds of gospel hymns and spirituals, dance music, plantation songs, syncopated rhythms, blues, and choruses.:190 After he studied music with several local teachers, his talent was noticed by a German immigrant music teacher, Julius Weiss, who chose to give the 11-year-old boy lessons free of charge. He was taught music theory, keyboard technique, and an appreciation of various European music styles, such as folk and opera. As an adult, Joplin also studied at an all-black college in Sedalia, Missouri.

"He composed music unlike any ever before written," according to Joplin biographer Edward Berlin. Eventually, "the piano-playing public clamored for his music; newspapers and magazines proclaimed his genius; musicians examined his scores with open admiration.":3 Ragtime historian Susan Curtis noted that "when Joplin syncopated his way into the hearts of millions of Americans at the turn of the century, he helped revolutionize American music and culture."

This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License.
It uses material from the Wikipedia article "Scott Joplin."
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