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The almanac

UPI Almanac for Wednesday, July 3, 2013.
By United Press International

The almanac

UPI Almanac for Tuesday, July 3, 2012.
By United Press International

Harvard: Old Canadian map not theirs

OTTAWA, Oct. 15 (UPI) -- Harvard University experts say a rare print of a 1612 map of Canada set to be auctioned in England next month isn't one stolen in 2005.

Harvard eyes 1612 Canada map in auction

OTTAWA, Oct. 13 (UPI) -- Harvard University experts are interested in a rare print of a 1612 map of Canada set to be auctioned in England after their copy went missing in 2005.

The almanac

UPI Almanac for Thursday, July 3, 2008.
By United Press International

Quebec prepares for 400th anniversary

QUEBEC, Sept. 28 (UPI) -- Quebec is preparing for a 10-month celebration of a milestone no other city in Canada has reached -- its 400th anniversary.

The Almanac

UPI almanac for Tuesday, July 3, 2007

Evidence found of early autopsy in 1604

BAR HARBOR, Maine, Nov. 6 (UPI) -- Forensic anthropologists in Maine said they have found the earliest skeletal evidence of autopsy procedures on a small island in the St. Croix River.

The Almanac

Today is Monday, July 3, the 184th day of 2006 with 181 to follow.
By United Press International

The Almanac

The weekly UPI Almanac package for July 3-9, 2006.
By United Press International

The Almanac

Today is Sunday, July 3, the 184th day of 2005 with 181 to follow.
By United Press International

The Almanac

Today is Thursday, July 3, the 184th day of 2003 with 181 to follow.
By United Press International

A Blast from the Past

Today is July 3.
By United Press International

The Almanac

Today is Wednesday, July 3, the 184th day of 2002 with 181 to follow.
By United Press International

A Blast from the Past

Today is July 1.
By United Press International
Wiki

Samuel de Champlain (French pronunciation:  born Samuel Champlain; ca. 1567 – December 25, 1635), "The Father of New France", was a French navigator, cartographer, draughtsman, soldier, explorer, geographer, ethnologist, diplomat, and chronicler. He founded New France and Quebec City on July 3, 1608.

Born into a family of master mariners, Champlain, while still a young man of 16, began exploring North America in 1603 under the guidance of François Gravé Du Pont. From 1604-1607, Champlain participated in the exploration and settlement of the first permanent European settlement north of Florida, Port Royal, Acadia (1605). Then, in 1608, he established the French settlement that is now Quebec City. Champlain was the first European to explore and describe the Great Lakes, and published maps of his journeys and accounts of what he learned from the natives and the French living among the Natives. He formed relationships with local Montagnais and Innu and later with others farther west (Ottawa River, Lake Nipissing, or Georgian Bay), with Algonquin and with Huron Wendat, and agreed to provide assistance in their wars against the Iroquois.

In 1620, Louis XIII ordered Champlain to cease exploration, return to Quebec, and devote himself to the administration of the country. In every way but formal title, Samuel de Champlain served as Governor of New France, a title that may have been formally unavailable to him owing to his non-noble status. He established trading companies that sent goods, primarily fur, to France, and oversaw the growth of New France in the St. Lawrence River valley until his death in 1635.

This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License.
It uses material from the Wikipedia article "Samuel de Champlain."
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