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The almanac

UPI Almanac for Saturday, Dec. 28, 2013.
By United Press International
Pearl Harbor a fading memory, but not forgotten

Pearl Harbor a fading memory, but not forgotten

SHREVEPORT, La., Dec. 7 (UPI) -- Historians say interest in Japan's Dec. 7, 1941, attack on Pearl Harbor was unlikely to fade as the last of the landmark battle's veterans fade away.

The almanac

UPI Almanac for Friday, Dec. 28, 2012.
By United Press International

The almanac

UPI Almanac for Wednesday, Dec. 28, 2011.
By United Press International

The almanac

UPI Almanac for Sunday, Dec. 28, 2008.
By United Press International

The almanac

UPI Almanac for Friday, Dec. 28, 2007.
By United Press International

The Almanac

UPI almanac for Thursday, Dec. 28, 2006.
By United Press International

The Almanac

Today is Wednesday, Dec. 28, the 362nd day of 2005 with three to follow.
By United Press International

The Almanac

Today is Tuesday, Dec. 28, the 363rd day of 2004 with three to follow.
By United Press International

The Almanac

Today is Sunday, Dec. 28, the 362nd day of 2003 with three to follow.
By United Press International

Almanac

Today is Saturday, Dec. 28, the 362nd day of 2002 with three to follow.
By United Press International

A Blast from the Past

On this date in 2001, President George W. Bush granted permanent normal trade status to China, reversing a 20-year policy of using access to U.S. markets as an annual enticement to China to expand freedoms. Congress previously approved the move over the o
By United Press International

A Blast from the Past

The weekly UPI Blast from the Past package for Dec. 23-29.
By United Press International

The Almanac

Today is Friday, Dec. 28, the 362nd day of 2001 with three to follow.
By United Press International

A Blast From The Past

Today is Dec. 28.
PENNY NELSON BARTHOLOMEW, United Press International
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Wiki

Poor Richard's Almanack (sometimes Almanac) was a yearly almanac published by Benjamin Franklin, who adopted the pseudonym of "Poor Richard" or "Richard Saunders" for this purpose. The publication appeared continually from 1732 to 1758. It was a best seller for a pamphlet published in the American colonies; print runs reached 10,000 per year.

Franklin, the American inventor, statesman, and publisher, achieved success with Poor Richard's Almanack. Almanacks were very popular books in colonial America, with people in the colonies using them for the mixture of seasonal weather forecasts, practical household hints, puzzles, and other amusements they offered. Poor Richard's Almanack was popular for all of these reasons, and also for its extensive use of wordplay, with many examples derived from the work surviving in the contemporary American vernacular.

The Almanack contained the calendar, weather, poems, sayings and astronomical and astrological information that a typical almanac of the period would contain. Franklin also included the occasional mathematical exercise, and the Almanack from 1750 features an early example of demographics. It is chiefly remembered, however, for being a repository of Franklin's aphorisms and proverbs, many of which live on in American English. These maxims typically counsel thrift and courtesy, with a dash of cynicism.

This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License.
It uses material from the Wikipedia article "Richard Saunders."
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