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UPI Almanac for Wednesday, Oct. 2, 2013.
By United Press International

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UPI Almanac for Tuesday, Oct. 2, 2012.
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UPI Almanac for Sunday, Oct, 2, 2011.
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Liquor truck hijacked in Indianapolis

INDIANAPOLIS, Oct. 30 (UPI) -- Two men beat a truck driver in Indianapolis and stole a trailer full of 1,250 cases of miscellaneous liquor, police said Friday.

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UPI Almanac for Thursday, Oct. 2, 2008.
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UPI Almanac for Tuesday, Oct. 2, 2007.
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Purdue Cancer Center gets $1.5M gift

WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind., Sept. 26 (UPI) -- The Purdue University Cancer Center -- one of seven National Cancer Institute-designated U.S. basic research facilities -- has received a $1.5 million gift.

Twins fight over paternity of a love child

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo., May 21 (UPI) -- Missouri twins Raymon and Richard Miller are unsure who is the father and who is the uncle of a 3-year-old girl even after three years in court.

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UPI almanacs for Monday, Oct. 2, 2006.
By United Press International

Probation for teen's dad in fatal crash

PHILADELPHIA, Feb. 28 (UPI) -- A Philadelphia-area man who allowed his unlicensed 15-year-old daughter to take the wheel resulting in a fatal accident has been sentenced to probation.

The Almanac

Today is Sunday, Oct. 2, the 275th day of 2005 with 90 to follow.
By United Press International

Tsunami may cost $3 billion in tourism

NEW DELHI, April 9 (UPI) -- The 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami could cost people in several nations up to 250,000 jobs and the global tourism industry could lose up to $3 billion.

The Almanac

Today is Saturday, Oct. 2, the 276th day of 2004 with 90 to follow.
By United Press International

World's oldest known mouse turns 4

ANN ARBOR, Mich., April 12 (UPI) -- A mouse in a U.S. lab turned 4 Saturday, only the second to reach twice its life expectancy without the use of an extremely low-calorie diet.

Audit: some charities 'puff' African needs

LONDON, Jan. 17 (UPI) -- A group of British charities overstated the extent of African food shortages in the last two years, an audit has determined.
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Wiki

Richard W. Miller was the first member of the FBI to be indicted for espionage.

On October 3, 1984, Miller was arrested with Svetlana and Nikolai Ogorodnikov, Russian immigrants who had moved to Los Angeles in 1973 to seek refuge, but who were actually access agents of the Soviet KGB. Miller was alleged to have provided classified documents, including an FBI Counterintelligence manual, to the Ogorodnikovs after demanding $50,000 in gold and $15,000 cash in return. Miller, who had eight children and was faced with financial difficulties, was having an affair with the married Svetlana Ogorodnikov, and was preparing to travel with her to Vienna at the time of his arrest. It was later alleged that Svetlana Ogorodnikov had been in touch with a KGB case officer working out of the Soviet Consulate in San Francisco and had made arrangements for Miller to meet with the KGB in Vienna.

After his arrest, a fuller portrait emerged of Miller. According to various news accounts, Miller occasionally took three-hour "lunches" at the 7-Elevens near his Los Angeles office, gorging himself on stolen candy bars while reading comic books. He was alleged to have cheated his own uncle by selling a muscle-relaxant device he'd patented, and skimmed cash from bureau coffers meant for one of his informants. Miller also ran auto-registration checks and searched FBI criminal indexes for a local private investigator at $500 per search. In early 1984, the Mormon Church excommunicated Miller for adultery. He was divorced from his wife, Paula Miller (now renamed Hill), in late 1988. He currently resides in northern Utah with his 2nd wife, Tamara.

This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License.
It uses material from the Wikipedia article "Richard Miller."
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