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'The Princess Bride' is headed to Broadway

'The Princess Bride' is headed to Broadway

NEW YORK, Nov. 11 (UPI) -- Broadway's Disney Theatrical Productions says it is developing William Goldman's beloved book and movie, "The Princess Bride," as a stage work.
Chuck Lorre to be honored by the Producers Guild of America

Chuck Lorre to be honored by the Producers Guild of America

LOS ANGELES, Oct. 23 (UPI) -- The Producers Guild of America announced Wednesday plans to honor prolific producer Chuck Lorre with the 2014 Norman Lear Achievement Award in Television.

The almanac

UPI Almanac for Saturday, July 27, 2013.
By United Press International

The almanac

UPI Almanac for Friday, July 27, 2012.
By United Press International

Producer Lear moving from TV to politics

LOS ANGELES, Feb. 16 (UPI) -- Noted producer Norman Lear, who worked on 1970s TV series such as "All in the Family," has a new focus in life: energizing young U.S. voters.

Thousands picket outside Fox

CENTURY CITY, Calif., Nov. 9 (UPI) -- An estimated 4,000 people protested outside Fox Studios in Los Angeles Friday, shutting down Avenue of the Stars on day five of the Hollywood writers strike.

The Almanac

UPI almanac for Friday, July 27, 2007.

Silverman unveils revamped NBC line-up

LOS ANGELES, July 17 (UPI) -- Ben Silverman, in his first meeting with Hollywood media as NBC Entertainment chief, unveiled a new fall schedule and projects such as a Norman Lear dramedy.

California governor showing his age

SACRAMENTO, Jan. 26 (UPI) -- Time may be catching up to California Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger, who turns 60 in a few months and has reportedly appeared weary lately.

The Almanac

Today is Thursday, July 27, the 208th day of 2006 with 157 to follow.
By United Press International

The Almanac

Today is Wednesday, July 27, the 208th day of 2005 with 157 to follow.
By United Press International

TV campaign to fight Senate rules change

WASHINGTON, March 29 (UPI) -- People for the American Way Foundation, founded by Hollywood producer Norman Lear, pledged $5 million Tuesday to a campaign to save the Senate filibuster.

Broadcast license law could be tightened

WASHINGTON, Feb. 16 (UPI) -- Congress will consider legislation tightening regulations on U.S. broadcasting licenses, The Hollywood Reporter said Wednesday.

Analysis: Publicity-machine glitches

LOS ANGELES, Dec. 14 (UPI) -- A recent power struggle between two of Hollywood's most powerful publicists offered outsiders a rare glimpse behind the entertainment industry curtain -- and a
PAT NASON, UPI Hollywood Reporter

Analysis: Relevant nightly news

LOS ANGELES, Nov. 25 (UPI) -- The announcement that Dan Rather is retiring from the CBS News main anchor chair next March, and next week's departure of Tom Brokaw from the NBC anchor chair,
PAT NASON, UPI Hollywood Reporter
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Wiki

Norman Milton Lear (born July 27, 1922) is an American television writer and producer who produced such 1970s sitcoms as All in the Family, Sanford and Son, One Day at a Time, The Jeffersons, Good Times and Maude. As a political activist, he founded the civil liberties advocacy organization People For the American Way in 1981 and has supported First Amendment rights and liberal causes.

Lear was born in New Haven, Connecticut, the son of Jeanette (née Seicol) and Herman Lear, who worked in sales. He grew up in a Jewish home and had a Bar Mitzvah. Lear went to high school in Hartford, Connecticut and subsequently attended Emerson College in Boston, but dropped out in 1942 to join the United States Army Air Forces. During World War II, he served in the Mediterranean Theater as a radio operator/gunner on Boeing B-17 Flying Fortress bombers with the 772nd Bombardment Squadron, 463rd Bombardment Group (Heavy) of the Fifteenth Air Force. He flew 52 combat missions, for which he was awarded the Air Medal with four Oak Leaf Clusters. Lear was discharged from the Army in 1945. He and his fellow World War II crew members are featured in the book "Crew Umbriago" by Daniel P.Carroll (tail gunner), and also in another book: 772nd Bomb Squadron: The Men, The Memories by Turner Publishing Company.

In 1954, Lear was enlisted as a writer hoping to salvage the new Celeste Holm CBS sitcom, Honestly, Celeste!, but the program was canceled after eight episodes. During this time, he became the producer of NBC's The Martha Raye Show, after Nat Hiken left as the series director. In 1959, Lear created his first television series starring Henry Fonda, a half-hour western for Revue Studios called The Deputy. Starting out as a comedy writer, then a film director (he wrote and produced the 1967 film Divorce American Style and directed the 1971 film Cold Turkey, both starring Dick Van Dyke), Lear tried to sell a concept for a sitcom about a blue-collar American family to ABC. They rejected the show after two pilots were filmed. After a third pilot was shot, CBS picked up the show, known as All in the Family. It premiered January 12, 1971 to disappointing ratings, but it took home several Emmy Awards that year, including Outstanding Comedy Series. The show did very well in summer reruns, and it flourished in the 1971-1972 season, becoming the top-rated show on TV for the next five years. After falling from the #1 spot, All in the Family still remained in the top ten, well after it transitioned into Archie Bunker's Place. The show was based on the British sitcom Til Death Us Do Part, about an irascible working-class Tory and his Socialist son-in-law.

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