facebook
twitter
rss
account
search
search
Headlines

The Almanac

Today is Sunday, March 27, the 86th day of 2005 with 279 to follow.
By United Press International

The Almanac

Today is Monday, March 21, the 80th day of 2005 with 285 to follow.
By United Press International

The Almanac

Today is Friday, Oct. 15, the 289th day of 2004 with 77 to follow.
By United Press International

The Almanac

Today is Tuesday, Oct. 12, the 286th day of 2004 with 80 to follow.
By United Press International

The Almanac

Today is Friday, Sept. 24, the 268th day of 2004 with 98 to follow.
By United Press International

The Almanac

Today is Sunday, Sept. 12, the 256th day of 2004 with 110 to follow.
By United Press International

The Almanac

Today is Friday, July 9, the 191st day of 2004 with 175 to follow.
By United Press International

Future bright for Baikonur Cosmodrome

BAIKONUR, Kazakhstan, July 1 (UPI) -- The oldest manned spaceport in the world is also still the busiest and, as it has so often in the past, the Baikonur Cosmodrome is once again beating the odds.
MARTIN SIEFF, UPI Senior News Analyst

The Almanac

Today is Friday, May 7, the 128th day of 2004 with 238 to follow.
By United Press International

The Almanac

Today is Saturday, April 17, the 108th day of 2004 with 258 to follow.
By United Press International

The Almanac

Today is Saturday, March 27, the 87th day of 2004 with 279 to follow.
By United Press International

The Almanac

Today is Sunday, March 21, the 81st day of 2004 with 285 to follow.
By United Press International

Russian dorm fire kills 18

MOSCOW, Nov. 23 (UPI) -- An early morning dormitory fire at a Moscow university Monday killed at least 18 students and injured 80 others.

Nov. 1963: $100,000 and a visit to Dallas

The night after President Kennedy died 40 years ago, an amazing telex arrived at my office. It read, "Pack $100,000 into your suitcase at once, fly to Dallas an
UWE SIEMON-NETTO, UPI Religious Affairs Editor

The Bear's Lair: Was JFK a supply-sider?

WASHINGTON, Nov. 10 (UPI) -- The 40th anniversary of President John F. Kennedy's assassination later this month is bringing the inevitable slew of retrospectives, either polishing the halo or belittling the achievements, according to taste. However, in the economic area, Kennedy's g
MARTIN HUTCHINSON, UPI Business and Economics Editor
Page 6 of 10
Photos
Nikita Khrushchev
Andrei Gromyko and Nikita Khrushchev in un undated file photo (1960s?). (UPI Photo/Files)
Wiki

Nikita Sergeyevich Khrushchev (April 15 1894 – September 11, 1971) led the Soviet Union during part of the Cold War. He served as First Secretary of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union from 1953 to 1964, and as Chairman of the Council of Ministers, or Premier, from 1958 to 1964. Khrushchev was responsible for the partial de-Stalinization of the Soviet Union, for backing the progress of the early Soviet space program, and for several relatively liberal reforms in areas of domestic policy. Khrushchev's party colleagues removed him from power in 1964, replacing him with Leonid Brezhnev as First Secretary and Alexei Kosygin as Premier.

Khrushchev was born in the Russian village of Kalinovka in 1894, close to the present-day border between Russia and Ukraine. He was employed as a metalworker in his youth, and during the Russian Civil War was a political commissar. With the help of Lazar Kaganovich, he worked his way up the Soviet hierarchy. He supported Joseph Stalin's purges, and approved thousands of arrests. In 1939, Stalin sent him to govern Ukraine, and he continued the purges there. During what was known in the Soviet Union as the Great Patriotic War (Eastern Front of World War II), Khrushchev was again a commissar, serving as an intermediary between Stalin and his generals. Khrushchev was present at the bloody defense of Stalingrad, a fact he took great pride in throughout his life. After the war, he returned to Ukraine before being recalled to Moscow as one of Stalin's close advisers.

In the power struggle triggered by Stalin's death in 1953, Khrushchev, after several years, emerged victorious. On February 25, 1956, at the Twentieth Party Congress, he delivered the "Secret Speech", denouncing Stalin's purges and ushering in a less repressive era in the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (USSR). His domestic policies, aimed at bettering the lives of ordinary citizens, were often ineffective, especially in the area of agriculture. Hoping eventually to rely on missiles for national defense, Khrushchev ordered major cuts in conventional forces. Despite the cuts, Khrushchev's rule saw the tensest years of the Cold War, culminating in the Cuban Missile Crisis.

This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License.
It uses material from the Wikipedia article "Nikita Khrushchev."
Quotes
Most Popular
1
Hershey's new logo launched, compared to emoji poop
2
Vicki Gunvalson explains what gay looks like to her
3
Al Pacino rules Venice Film Festival on Saturday
4
Kate Beckinsale joined by Lucas Till in 'The Disappointments Room'
5
Kenya Moore denies rumors she's dating Kordell Stewart
x
Feedback