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UPI Almanac for Monday, Nov. 11, 2013.
By United Press International

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UPI Almanac for Wednesday, Oct. 2, 2013.
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UPI Almanac for Wednesday, Aug. 21, 2013.
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The almanac

UPI Almanac for Sunday, Nov. 11, 2012.
By United Press International

The almanac

UPI Almanac for Tuesday, Oct. 2, 2012.
By United Press International

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UPI Almanac for Tuesday, Aug. 21, 2012.
By United Press International

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UPI Almanac for Friday, Nov. 11, 2011.
By United Press International

The almanac

UPI Almanac for Sunday, Oct, 2, 2011.
By United Press International

The almanac

UPI Almanac for Thursday, Aug. 21, 2008.
By United Press International

Confederate monument defaced in Alabama

MONTGOMERY, Ala., Nov. 17 (UPI) -- A Civil War memorial on the grounds of the Alabama statehouse was vandalized, with the face of a Confederate soldier painted over.

The almanac

UPI Almanac for Sunday, Nov. 11, 2007.
By United Press International

The almanac

UPI Almanac for Tuesday, Oct. 2, 2007.
By United Press International

The almanac

UPI Almanac for Tuesday, Aug. 21, 2007.
By United Press International

The Almanac

UPI almanac for Nov. 11, 2006.
By United Press International

The Almanac

UPI almanacs for Monday, Oct. 2, 2006.
By United Press International
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Nat Turner
NYP2002051005- NEW YORK, May 10 (UPI)-- Author William Stryon discusses the writing of his classic novel "The Confessions of Nat Turner," and his memories of the early years of Random House publishing on May 9, 2002, at New York City's Barnes and Nobel bookstore. mk/ep/Ezio Petersen UPI
Wiki

Nathaniel "Nat" Turner (October 2, 1800 – November 11, 1831) was an American slave who led a slave rebellion in Virginia on August 21, 1831 that resulted in 56 white deaths and over 55 black deaths, the largest number of fatalities to occur in one uprising prior to the American Civil War in the southern United States. He gathered supporters in Southampton County, Virginia. Turner was convicted, sentenced to death, and executed. In the aftermath, the state executed 56 blacks accused of being part of Turner's slave rebellion. Two hundred blacks were also beaten and killed by white militias and mobs reacting with violence. Across Virginia and other southern states, state legislators passed new laws prohibiting education of slaves and free blacks, restricting rights of assembly and other civil rights for free blacks, and requiring white ministers to be present at black worship services.

At birth, Turner's master recorded only his given name, Nat, although he may have had a last name within the slave community. In accordance with common practice, the whites referred to him by the last name of his owner, Samuel Turner. This practice was continued by historians. Turner knew little about his father's background, who was believed to have escaped from slavery when Turner was a young boy. Turner remained close to his paternal grandmother, Old Bridget, who was also enslaved by Samuel Turner. Turner's maternal grandmother was one of the Coromantee from present day Ghana, a group known for slave revolts. She was captured in Africa at thirteen years of age and shipped to America.

Turner spent his life in Southampton County, Virginia, a predominantly black area. After the rebellion, a reward notice described Turner as:

This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License.
It uses material from the Wikipedia article "Nat Turner."
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