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UPI Almanac for Sunday, May 4, 2014

UPI Almanac for Sunday, May 4, 2014

UPI Almanac for Sunday, May 4, 2014
By United Press International

The almanac

UPI Almanac for Friday, Feb. 28, 2014.
By United Press International

The almanac

UPI Almanac for Saturday, May 4, 2013.
By United Press International

The almanac

UPI Almanac for Thursday, Feb. 28, 2013.
By United Press International

The almanac

UPI Almanac for Friday, May 4, 2012.
By United Press International

The almanac

UPI Almanac for Tuesday, Feb. 28, 2012.
By United Press International

The almanac

UPI Almanac for Sunday, May 4, 2008.
By United Press International

The Almanac

UPI almanac for Friday, May 4, 2007.
By United Press International

The Almanac

Today is Thursday, May 4, the 124th day of 2006 with 241 to follow.
By United Press International

The Almanac

Today is Wednesday, May 4, the 124th day of 2005 with 241 to follow.
By United Press International

The Almanac

Today is Tuesday, May 4, the 125th day of 2004 with 241 to follow.
By United Press International

The Almanac

Today is Sunday, May 4, the 124th day of 2003 with 241 to follow.
By United Press International

The Almanac

Today is Saturday, May 4, the 124th day of 2002 with 241 to follow. The moon is in its last quarter. There are no morning stars.
By United Press International

The Almanac

Today is Thursday, Feb. 28, the 59th day of 2002 with 306 to follow. The moon is waning, moving toward its last quarter.

Thinking About Life: disaster & philosopy

NEW YORK, Oct. 1 (UPI) -- Is disaster a spur to philosophy? It is certainly a spur to reflection and stock-taking.
ROGER KIMBALL
Wiki

Michel Eyquem de Montaigne (French pronunciation: ) (February 28, 1533 – September 13, 1592) was one of the most influential writers of the French Renaissance, known for popularising the essay as a literary genre and is popularly thought of as the father of Modern Skepticism. He became famous for his effortless ability to merge serious intellectual speculation with casual anecdotes and autobiography—and his massive volume Essais (translated literally as "Attempts") contains, to this day, some of the most widely influential essays ever written. Montaigne had a direct influence on writers the world over, including René Descartes, Blaise Pascal, Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Friedrich Nietzsche, Stefan Zweig, Eric Hoffer, Isaac Asimov, and perhaps William Shakespeare (see section "Related Writers and Influence" below).

In his own time, Montaigne was admired more as a statesman than as an author. The tendency in his essays to digress into anecdotes and personal ruminations was seen as detrimental to proper style rather than as an innovation, and his declaration that, 'I am myself the matter of my book', was viewed by his contemporaries as self-indulgent. In time, however, Montaigne would be recognized as embodying, perhaps better than any other author of his time, the spirit of freely entertaining doubt which began to emerge at that time. He is most famously known for his skeptical remark, 'Que sais-je?' ('What do I know?'). Remarkably modern even to readers today, Montaigne's attempt to examine the world through the lens of the only thing he can depend on implicitly—his own judgment—makes him more accessible to modern readers than any other author of the Renaissance. Much of modern literary non-fiction has found inspiration in Montaigne and writers of all kinds continue to read him for his masterful balance of intellectual knowledge and personal story-telling.

Montaigne was born in the Aquitaine region of France, on the family estate Château de Montaigne, in a town now called Saint-Michel-de-Montaigne, not far from Bordeaux. The family was very rich; his grandfather, Ramon Eyquem, had made a fortune as a herring merchant and had bought the estate in 1477. His father, Pierre Eyquem, was a French Roman Catholic soldier in Italy for a time and had also been the mayor of Bordeaux. His mother, Antoinette López de Villanueva, was from a wealthy (Marrano) Sephardic Jewish family. Although she lived a great part of Montaigne's life near him, and even survived him, she is only mentioned twice in his work. Montaigne's relationship with his father, however, played a prominent role in his life and works.

This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License.
It uses material from the Wikipedia article "Michel de Montaigne."
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