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Jazz Notes: Goings on in the jazz world

Clarinetist Johnny Dodds was born this day in Waverly, La., in 1892. He was an important member of King Oliver's Creole Jazz Band in Chicago, recording more than 40 songs with Oliver between 1921 and 1924, when he left the band in a pay disagreement.
KEN FRANCKLING, United Press International

Today in Music: a look back at pop music

Today's birthdays include Tommy Cash, Johnny's brother, who was born in 1940 (age 63; singer Eric Burdon in 1941 (age 62); Allan Clarke of the Hollies in 1942 (age 61); Whispers' Nicholas Caldwell in 1944 (age 59); actress Jane Asher, Paul McCartney's one
By United Press International

Rock News: Music's high and low notes

Former Judas Priest frontman Rob Halford will headline the 2003 Metal Gods Tour, a multi-band package featuring the headliner's quintet Halford, co-headliners Testament, Immortal, Symphony X, Dark Tranquility, Amon Amarth, Carnal Forge and more.
JOHN SWENSON, United Press International

Jazz Condition -- UPI Arts & Entertainment

The last time we caught up with Jimmy Amadie, the Philadelphia-area pianist had just completed his second solo recording, "Savoring Every Note," in 1998.
KEN FRANCKLING, United Press International

Maureen McGovern, 30 years as hit singer

NEW YORK, March 10 (UPI) -- Maureen McGovern, who has been called America's Julie Andrews, is marking the 30th anniversary of her first big hit as a singer with an evening of cabaret titled "Here's To Love and Life."
FREDERICK M. WINSHIP

People

TALK ABOUT A SONG 'GOING COMMERCIAL'
DENNIS DAILY, United Press International

Jazz Notes: Goings on in the jazz world

Trumpeter and bandleader Charlie Creath was born this day in 1890 in Ironton, Mo. He was a major figure in St. Louis music circles and a big influence on the city's many emerging trumpeters including Shorty Baker, Clark Terry and Miles Davis.
KEN FRANCKLING, United Press International

Animal Tales: Do reindeer really fly?

As it says in the song, "ev'ry mother's child is gonna spy, to see if reindeer really know how to fly," and as one zoologist tells it, they really do - sort of.
ALEX CUKAN, United Press International

Heartland -- UPI Arts & Entertainment

NASHVILLE, Dec. 12 (UPI) -- The country music lover will find no shortage of new holiday music in his or her stocking this year.
CRYSTAL CAVINESS, United Press International

Today in Music: a look back at pop music

Today's birthdays include the late Bill Monroe, the "father of bluegrass," who was born in 1911, the late Mel Torme in 1925, James Johnson of the 1950s R&B group the Jayhawks in 1939 (age 63), the late Tim Hardin in 1940; Blood Sweat and Tears lead singer
By United Press International

The Almanac

Today is Friday, Sept. 13, the 256th day of 2002 with 109 to follow.
By United Press International

Jazz Notes: Goings on in the jazz world

Tenor saxophonist Chu Berry was born this day in 1910 in Wheeling, W.Va. He was a full-blown, fast-fingered master of the tenor horn who remains under-rated despite his sound and his key role in the Cab Calloway band from 1937 until his death in 1941 from
KEN FRANCKLING, United Press International

Today in Music: a look back at pop music

The weekly Today in Music package for Sept. 7-13.
By United Press International

Jazz Notes: Goings on in the jazz world

New Orleans clarinetist Pete Fountain was born this day in the Crescent City in 1930. He came to prominence in the late 1950s when he teamed up with bandleader Lawrence Welk for live appearances, recordings and a network television series. Fountain perfor
KEN FRANCKLING, United Press International

People

ROSIE CLOONEY ... DID SHE HAVE CLASS! The one-time pop "girl singer" became an actress and finally the grande dame of saloon singers. This year she won a Grammy. Now, she's dead.
DENNIS DAILY, United Press International
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Wiki

Melvin Howard Tormé (September 13, 1925 – June 5, 1999), nicknamed The Velvet Fog, was an American musician, known for his jazz singing. He was also a jazz composer and arranger, a drummer, an actor in radio, film, and television, and the author of five books. He composed the music for the classic holiday song "The Christmas Song" ("Chestnuts Roasting on an Open Fire") and co-wrote the lyrics with Bob Wells.

Melvin Howard Tormé was born in Chicago, Illinois, to immigrant Russian Jewish parents, whose surname had been Torma. However, the name was changed at Ellis Island to "Torme." A child prodigy, he first sang professionally at age 4 with the Coon-Sanders Orchestra, singing "You're Driving Me Crazy" at Chicago's Blackhawk restaurant.

Between 1933 and 1941, he acted in the network radio serials The Romance of Helen Trent and Jack Armstrong, the All-American Boy. He wrote his first song at 13, and three years later, his first published song, "Lament to Love," became a hit recording for Harry James. He played drums in Chicago's Shakespeare Elementary School drum and bugle corps in his early teens. While a teenager, he sang, arranged, and played drums in a band led by Chico Marx of the Marx Brothers. His formal education ended in 1944 with his graduation from Chicago's Hyde Park High School.

This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License.
It uses material from the Wikipedia article "Mel Torme."
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