facebook
twitter
rss
account
search
search
Headlines

Vitamin C slowed tumor growth in mice

BETHESDA, Md., Aug. 5 (UPI) -- High-dose injections of vitamin C reduced tumor growth in mice by 50 percent, U.S. researchers said.

Vitamin C: possible cancer-killing promise

WASHINGTON, Sept. 12 (UPI) -- High-dose intravenous vitamin C may be effective in treating cancer, newly published research indicates.

Washington Agenda-General

UNITED PRESS INTERNATIONAL
By United Press International

Jazz Notes: Goings on in the jazz world

Boogie-woogie piano master Pete Johnson was born this day in 1904 in Kansas City, Mo. He worked regularly in boogie-woogie trios and duos with Albert Ammons and Meade Lux Lewis.
KEN FRANCKLING, United Press International

Jazz Notes: Goings on in the jazz world

Pianist Clyde Hart was born this day in 1910 in Baltimore. After working with Stuff Smith, Roy Eldridge and Oscar Pettiford, he became a regular at Minton's Playhouse in Harlem where the bop style was being developed.
KEN FRANCKLING, United Press International

Jazz Notes: Goings on in the jazz world

Trumpeter and bandleader Charlie Creath was born this day in 1890 in Ironton, Mo. He was a major figure in St. Louis music circles and a big influence on the city's many emerging trumpeters including Shorty Baker, Clark Terry and Miles Davis.
KEN FRANCKLING, United Press International

Jazz Notes: Goings on in the jazz world

Earl Hines, one of the pianists who helped shape the history of jazz, was born this day in 1903 in Duquesne, Pa. His level of rhythmic and melodic invention was so influential other musicians nicknamed him "Fatha."
KEN FRANCKLING, United Press International

Jazz Notes: Goings on in the jazz world

Saxophonist Budd Johnson was born this date in 1910 in Dallas.
KEN FRANCKLING, United Press International

Jazz Notes: Goings on in the jazz world

Jazz violinist Eddie South was born this day in 1904 in Louisiana, Mo. South was one of the finest classical violinists ever to play jazz.
KEN FRANCKLING, United Press International

Jazz Notes: Goings on in the jazz world

Tenor saxophonist Jack McVea was born this day in 1914 in Los Angeles. He joined Lionel Hampton's band in 1940 as a baritone player.
KEN FRANCKLING, United Press International

Jazz Notes: Goings on in the jazz world

Singer Ethel Waters was born this day in 1896 in Chester, Pa.
KEN FRANCKLING, United Press International

Jazz Notes: Goings on in the jazz world

Saxophonist and bandleader Boyd Raeburn was born this day in 1913 in Faith, S.D. He led an innovative bop band in the 1940s.
KEN FRANCKLING, United Press International

Jazz Notes: Goings on in the jazz world

Ferdinand Joseph Lemott, better known to the music world as Jelly Roll Morton, was born this day in 1890. By the time he was 12 years old, he was playing ragtime piano in bordellos in the Storyville section of his native New Orleans.
KEN FRANCKLING, United Press International

Jazz Notes: Goings on in the jazz world

Clarinetist Alphonse Picou was born this day in 1878 in New Orleans. He played with the major bands and orchestras in New Orleans as well as the smaller, improvising jazz bands. His day job was as a tinsmith. He recorded in 1940 with Kid Rena and worked r
KEN FRANCKLING, United Press International

Washington Agenda-General

UNITED PRESS INTERNATIONAL
By United Press International
Prev
Page 1 of 4
Wiki

Mark LeVine is a professor of history at the University of California, Irvine. He is also a musician. He received his B.A. in comparative religion and biblical studies from Hunter College and his M.A. and Ph.D. from New York University's Department of Middle Eastern Studies. He speaks Arabic, Hebrew, Turkish, and Persian, as well as Italian, French and German.

LeVine is an accomplished rock guitarist and has played with noted rock and world beat musicians such as Mick Jagger, Chuck D, Michael Franti, and Doctor John. He recorded with Morroccan Hassan Hakmoun and the French Gypsy band Les Yeux Noirs on Ozomatli's album Street Signs which won the Grammy for Best Latin Rock/Alternative album in 2005.

In a review of LeVine's book Why They Don't Hate Us, the London Sunday Times writes, "LeVine is absolutely right and, indeed, quite brave to insist on the reality of complexity. Terrorism and war both tend to simplify world views and, without doubting their intellectual status, so do the utopians of the new right... Perhaps his book’s greatest virtue is that it introduces both the many shades of opinion and cultural complexity of the, largely, Arab world. In addition, LeVine is absolutely right to insist on the importance of culture... LeVine detonates the uneasy but nonetheless profound complacency that seems to have invaded politics."

This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License.
It uses material from the Wikipedia article "Mark Levine."
Most Popular
1
Merkel urges Putin to withdraw Russian troops from Ukraine Merkel urges Putin to withdraw Russian troops from Ukraine
2
Joan Rivers' doctor reportedly took a selfie while comedienne was under anesthesia Joan Rivers' doctor reportedly took a selfie while comedienne was under anesthesia
3
Audi gets permit to test self-driving cars in California Audi gets permit to test self-driving cars in California
4
Homeless man gets women to take him home Homeless man gets women to take him home
5
Schizophrenia is actually eight disorders, not one disease Schizophrenia is actually eight disorders, not one disease
x
Feedback