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Nixon suspected Felt was 'Deep Throat'

WASHINGTON, June 3 (UPI) -- President Nixon suspected that the FBI's W. Mark Felt was "Deep Throat," helping the Washington Post on Watergate, White House transcripts show.

Woodward details Deep Throat contact

WASHINGTON, June 2 (UPI) -- Washington Post reporter Bob Woodward said he wouldn't reveal Deep Throat's identity but an article Thursday hints he was ready for when the truth came out.

Deep Throat: patriot or traitor?

WASHINGTON, June 2 (UPI) -- The drama of Deep Throat's identity over, players of the U.S. Watergate scandal are battling over whether W. Mark Felt is a great patriot or traitor.

'Deep Throat' family wanted cash for story

NEW YORK, June 1 (UPI) -- The family of the mystery man known as "Deep Throat" in the Watergate saga wanted to tell the story to Vanity Fair two years ago -- for a price.

Washington mixed on Deep Throat emergence

WASHINGTON, June 1 (UPI) -- Reactions in Washington to the identification of the Watergate-era Deep Throat tipster ranged Wednesday from praise to accusations of being a traitor.

Post confirms Mark Felt is 'Deep Throat'

WASHINGTON, May 31 (UPI) -- The Washington Post confirmed Tuesday W. Mark Felt, the FBI's former No. 2 man, is "Deep Throat," whose help led to President Nixon's resignation.
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Wiki

William Mark Felt, Sr. (August 17, 1913 – December 18, 2008) was an agent of the United States Federal Bureau of Investigation who retired in 1973 as the Bureau's Associate Director. After denying his involvement with reporters Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein for 30 years, Felt revealed himself on May 31, 2005, to be the Watergate scandal's whistleblower, "Deep Throat."

Felt worked in several FBI field offices prior to his promotion to the Bureau's headquarters in Washington, D.C. During the early investigation of the Watergate scandal (1972–1974), and shortly after the death of longtime FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover on May 2, 1972, Felt was the Bureau's Associate Director, the second-ranking post in the FBI. While Associate Director, Felt provided Washington Post reporter Woodward with critical leads on the story that eventually saw the resignation of President Richard M. Nixon in 1974. In 1980, Felt was convicted of the felony of violating the civil rights of people thought to be associated with members of the Weather Underground Organization, by ordering FBI agents to search their homes as part of an attempt to prevent bombings. He was ordered to pay a $7,000 fine, but was pardoned by President Ronald Reagan during his appeal. In 2006, he published an update of his 1979 autobiography, The FBI Pyramid. His last book, written with John O'Connor, is titled A G-Man's Life.

William Mark Felt was born on August 17, 1913, in Twin Falls, Idaho, the son of carpenter and building contractor Mark Earl Felt and his wife, the former Rose R. Dygert. After graduating from Twin Falls High School in 1931, he received a BA from the University of Idaho in 1935, and was a member and president of the Gamma Gamma chapter of the Beta Theta Pi fraternity.

This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License.
It uses material from the Wikipedia article "Mark Felt."
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