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Today is Wednesday, June 19, the 170th day of 2002 with 195 to follow.
By United Press International

Think Tanks Wrap-up

WASHINGTON, Dec. 24 (UPI) -- The UPI Think Tank Wrap-Up is a daily digest covering brief opinion pieces, reactions to recent news events, and position statements released by various think t

Jockstrip: The World As We Know It

THE 'TRIPLE CROWN' --- OF HIKING?
PENNY NELSON BARTHOLOMEW, United Press International

American League MVP winners

NEW YORK, Nov. 20 (UPI) -- American League Most Valuable Player Award winners:

Cancer, arthritis drugs help ALS

SAN DIEGO, Nov. 12 (UPI) -- A drug commonly used to treat breast cancer and an established arthritis medication show promise in treating Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis or Lou Gehrig's disea
KOREN CAPOZZA, UPI Science News

Baseball Drama Soothes U.S. Soul

WASHINGTON, Nov. 5 (UPI) -- Yet another catchphrase to sum up the transformation of America since the terrorist slaughters of Sept. 11 -- Everything Old is New Again.
MARTIN SIEFF, Senior News Analyst

VideoView -- UPI Arts & Entertainment

What's new on the home video scene...
JACK E. WILKINSON, United Press International

In Sports from United Press International

Ripken plays final game
By United Press International

Boston 5, Baltimore 1

BALTIMORE, Oct. 6 (UPI) -- Cal Ripken Jr., arguably the greatest player in Baltimore Orioles' history and certainly one of the game's most popular figures, ended his career Saturday night
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Lou Gehrig
NYP2000100305- 03 OCTOBER 2000- NEW YORK, NEW YORK, USA: Actress Molly Ringwald attends the October 2 New York gala Tomorrow Is Tonight to support research for Lou Gehrig diease. rw/ep/Ezio Petersen UPI
Wiki

Henry Louis "Lou" Gehrig (June 19, 1903 – June 2, 1941), nicknamed "The Iron Horse" for his durability, was an American Major League Baseball first baseman. He played his entire 17-year baseball career for the New York Yankees (1923–1939). Gehrig set several major league records. He holds the record for most career grand slams (23). Gehrig is chiefly remembered for his prowess as a hitter, his consecutive games-played record and its subsequent longevity, and the pathos of his farewell from baseball at age 36, when he was stricken with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

Gehrig was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1939. In 1969 he was voted the greatest first baseman of all time by the Baseball Writers' Association, and was the leading vote-getter on the Major League Baseball All-Century Team, chosen by fans in 1999.

A native of New York City, he played for the New York Yankees until his career was cut short by amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), now commonly known in the United States and Canada as Lou Gehrig's disease. Over a 15-season span from 1925 through 1939, he played in 2,130 consecutive games, the streak ending only when Gehrig became disabled by the fatal neuromuscular disease that claimed his life two years later. His streak, long considered one of baseball's few unbreakable records, stood for 56 years, until finally broken by Cal Ripken, Jr., of the Baltimore Orioles on September 6, 1995.

This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License.
It uses material from the Wikipedia article "Lou Gehrig."
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