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UPI Almanac for Saturday, Feb. 8, 2014.
By United Press International

The almanac

UPI Almanac for Friday, Feb. 8, 2013.
By United Press International

The almanac

UPI Almanac for Wednesday, Feb. 8, 2012.
By United Press International

The almanac

UPI Almanac for Friday, Feb. 8, 2008.
By United Press International

The Almanac

UPI almanac for Thursday, Feb. 8, 2007.
By United Press International

The Almanac

Today is Wednesday, Feb. 8, the 39th day of 2006 with 326 to follow.
By United Press International

The Almanac

Today is Tuesday, Feb. 8, the 39th day of 2005 with 326 to follow.
By United Press International

The Almanac

Today is Sunday, Feb. 8, the 39th day of 2004 with 327 to follow.
By United Press International

The Almanac

Today is Saturday, Feb. 8, the 39th day of 2003 with 326 to follow.
By United Press International

The Almanac

Today is Friday, Feb. 8, the 39th day of 2002 with 326 to follow. The moon is waning, moving toward its new phase.
By United Press International
Wiki

King Wallis Vidor (February 8, 1894 – November 1, 1982) was an acclaimed American film director whose career spanned nearly seven decades.

He was born in Galveston, Texas, where he survived the great Galveston Hurricane of 1900. His grandfather, Charles Vidor, was a refugee of the Hungarian Revolution of 1848 who settled in Galveston in the early 1850s.

A freelance newsreel cameraman and cinema projectionist, he made his debut as a director in 1913 with Hurricane in Galveston. In Hollywood from 1915, he worked on a variety of film-related jobs before directing a feature film, The Turn in the Road, in 1919. A successful mounting of Peg o' My Heart in 1922 got him a long term contract with Goldwyn Studios, later to be absorbed into MGM. Three years later he made The Big Parade, among the most acclaimed war films of the silent era, and a tremendous commercial success. This success established him as one of MGM's top studio directors for the next decade. In 1928, Vidor received his first Oscar nomination, for The Crowd, widely regarded as his masterpiece and one of the greatest American silent films. In the same year, he made the classic Show People, the last silent film of Marion Davies, a comedy about the film industry in which Vidor had a cameo as himself.

This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License.
It uses material from the Wikipedia article "King Vidor."
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