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Justices suggest security check not essential part of work day

Justices suggest security check not essential part of work day

WASHINGTON, Oct. 8 (UPI) --The U.S. Supreme Court could cost retailers millions of dollars if it rules that Amazon warehouse workers must be paid for a post-shift security check.
Frances Burns
Law doesn't bar class action suits not involving covered securities

Law doesn't bar class action suits not involving covered securities

WASHINGTON, Feb. 26 (UPI) -- The U.S. Supreme Court ruled 7-2 Wednesday a federal securities law doesn't bar state class action suits if they don't involve securities covered in the law.

High court reaffirms burden of proof in patent infringement

WASHINGTON, Jan. 22 (UPI) -- The U.S. Supreme Court ruled unanimously Wednesday the burden of proof of infringement rests with a patent holder even if it wins a declaratory judgment.
The legal attack on the NSA

The legal attack on the NSA

WASHINGTON, Nov. 24 (UPI) -- A challenge to the National Security Agency's massive domestic snooping program whizzed by in the U.S. Supreme Court last week. If you blinked, you missed it.
MICHAEL KIRKLAND, UPI Senior Legal Affairs Writer

U.S. Supreme Court won't block Texas abortion law

WASHINGTON, Nov. 20 (UPI) -- A divided U.S. Supreme Court refused to block a controversial Texas abortion law critics say will force about a third of the clinics in the state to close.

Justices charge Alabama law creates 'illegitimacy' of death penalty

WASHINGTON, Nov. 19 (UPI) -- Two U.S. Supreme Court justices say the number of overrides of jury decisions by Alabama judges has created a "cloud of illegitimacy" about the death penalty.

The almanac

UPI Almanac for Thursday, Aug. 15, 2013.
By United Press International

Court allows anti-competitive drug suit to go forward

WASHINGTON, June 17 (UPI) -- The U.S. Supreme Court ruled 5-3 Monday a federal agency can sue drug companies for alleged payoffs to competitors.

Court narrows right to remain silent

WASHINGTON, June 17 (UPI) -- The U.S. Supreme Court ruled 5-4 Monday in a Texas murder case to narrow a suspect's right to remain silent.
DNA ruling a big win for police

DNA ruling a big win for police

WASHINGTON, June 9 (UPI) -- The U.S. Supreme Court, in a huge victory for law enforcement, ruled 5-4 last week that taking a DNA sample from prisoners accused of serious crimes does not violate the Constitution.
MICHAEL KIRKLAND, UPI Senior Legal Affairs Writer

Court allows ineffective counsel claims in Texas

WASHINGTON, May 28 (UPI) -- The U.S. Supreme Court ruled 5-4 Tuesday in a Texas case that a defendant may raise an ineffective counsel claim, even if the state framework doesn't permit it.

Supreme Court affirms deference due agencies over their jurisdiction

WASHINGTON, May 20 (UPI) -- An agency such as the Federal Communications Commission must be given deference concerning the scope of its jurisdiction, the U.S. Supreme Court said Monday.
Justice Stephen Breyer fractures shoulder in bike accident

Justice Stephen Breyer fractures shoulder in bike accident

WASHINGTON, April 27 (UPI) -- U.S. Supreme Court Justice Stephen Breyer was hospitalized with a fractured shoulder after a bicycle accident in Washington, a court spokeswoman said Saturday.

Supreme Court shakes up copyright law

WASHINGTON, March 19 (UPI) -- The Supreme Court Tuesday ruled foreign buyers of books, movies and other products can resell them in the United States over the copyright owners' objections.

Court narrows state court class action

WASHINGTON, March 19 (UPI) -- The U.S. Supreme Court Tuesday unanimously made it harder for a plaintiff to remove a case from a federal court to a more favorable state court.
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Photos
Justice Stephen Breyer
Supreme Court Justice Stephen Breyer speaks as the U.S. Mint launches the Chief Justice John Marshall Silver Dollar at the Supreme Court on May 4, 2005, in Washington. Behind Breyer is Supreme Court Historical Society President Peter Jones. (UPI Photo/Roger L. Wollenberg)
Wiki

Stephen Gerald Breyer ( /ˈbraɪər/; born August 15, 1938) is an Associate Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court. Appointed by Democratic President Bill Clinton in 1994, and known for his pragmatic approach to constitutional law, Breyer is generally associated with the more liberal side of the Court.

Following a clerkship with Supreme Court Associate Justice Arthur Goldberg in 1964, Breyer became well-known as a law professor and lecturer at Harvard Law School starting in 1967. There he specialized in the area of administrative law, writing a number of influential text books that remain in use today. He held other prominent positions before being nominated for the Supreme Court, including special assistant to the United States Assistant Attorney General for Antitrust, and assistant special prosecutor on the Watergate Special Prosecution Force in 1973.

In his 2005 book Active Liberty, Breyer made his first attempt to systematically lay out his views on legal theory, arguing that the judiciary should seek to resolve issues to encourage popular participation in governmental decisions.

This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License.
It uses material from the Wikipedia article "Justice Stephen Breyer."
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