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The almanac

UPI Almanac for Tuesday, March 18, 2014.
By United Press International

The almanac

UPI Almanac for Monday, March 18, 2013.
By United Press International

The almanac

UPI Almanac for Sunday, March 18, 2012.
By United Press International

The almanac

UPI Almanac for Tuesday, March 18, 2008.
By United Press International

Auctioned letter leads to artifact ring

ALBANY, N.Y., Jan. 29 (UPI) -- A letter by a 19th-century U.S. vice president sold on an Internet auction site led to the discovery of a larcenous artifact scheme, The New York Times said.

The Almanac

UPI almanac for Sunday, March 18, 2007.
By United Press International

The Almanac

Today is Saturday, March 18, the 77th day of 2006 with 288 to follow.
By United Press International

The Almanac

Today is Friday, March 18, the 77th day of 2005 with 288 to follow.
By United Press International

The Almanac

Today is Thursday, March 18, the 78th day of 2004 with 288 to follow.
By United Press International

The Almanac

Today is Tuesday, March 18, the 77th day of 2003 with 288 to follow.
By United Press International

Commentary: Congressman Billybob sez

HIGHLANDS, N.C., Dec. 26 (UPI) -- Congressman Billybob Sez: Ignorance in America

Commentary: The war hawks of 2002?

WASHINGTON, Sept. 20 (UPI) -- What does history tell us about the likelihood of the Republicans winning the 2002 Congressional elections as "War Hawks"? It seems to suggest that the strategy won't work, but that if it did, the long-term results for the incumbent party would be worse
JAMES B. CHAPIN, UPI National Political Analyst

The Almanac

Today is Monday, March 18, the 77th day of 2002 with 288 to follow. The moon is waxing, moving toward its first quarter.
By United Press International

The slave uprising that wasn't

WASHINGTON, Nov. 7 (UPI) -- It's generally accepted that Denmark Vesey, a 19th-century free black carpenter of Charleston, S.C., masterminded what would have been the largest slave rebelli
LOU MARANO
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John C. Calhoun
Wiki

John Caldwell Calhoun (pronounced /kælˈhuːn/; March 18, 1782 – March 31, 1850) was a leading politician and political theorist from South Carolina during the first half of the 19th century. A powerful intellect, Calhoun eloquently spoke out on every issue of his day, but often changed positions. Calhoun began his political career as a nationalist and proponent of protective tariffs; later, he switched to states' rights, limited government, nullification and free trade. He is best known for his intense and original defense of slavery as a positive good, for his promotion of minority rights, and for pointing the South toward secession from the Union.

Devoted to the principle of liberty and fearful of corruption, Calhoun built his reputation as a political theorist by his redefinition of republicanism to include approval of slavery and minority rights--with the white South the minority in question. To protect minority rights against majority rule he called for a "concurrent majority" whereby the minority could sometimes block offensive proposals. Increasingly distrustful of democracy, he minimized the role of the Second Party System in South Carolina. Calhoun's defense of slavery became defunct, but his concept of concurrent majority, whereby a minority has the right to object to or perhaps even veto hostile legislation directed against it, has been incorporated into the American value system.

He held every major post except president, serving in the House, Senate and vice presidency, as well as secretary of war and state. He usually affiliated with the Democrats, but flirted with the Whig Party and considered running for the presidency in 1824 and 1844. As a "war hawk" he agitated in Congress for the War of 1812 to defend American honor against Britain. As Secretary of War under President James Monroe he reorganized and modernized the War Department, building powerful permanent bureaucracies that ran the department, as opposed to patronage appointees.

This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License.
It uses material from the Wikipedia article "John C. Calhoun."
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